Blogs

Books Are Fun

No Boundaries in Preservation - Preservação sem Fronteiras - Preservación sin Fronteras

Tue, 19 Jul 2016 17:18:00 +0000

No Boundaries in Preservation has completed its project awarded by last year's University Libraries grant. It has accomplished its initial educational purpose, which was to provide equitable access to basic, relevant preservation and conservation information to a wider and diverse community of libraries and archives in the United States and abroad.

It was quite a journey through the year of 2015/2016 for those who participated in this project, directly or indirectly, doing research, filming, editing, translating and creating five original videos and posters, in three different languages. Not to mention the generosity of others in proof reading the materials, creating the website and collaborating to the content.

The result is a total of thirty educational resources! The theme of each original video and poster results from the answers of an online survey regarding preservation and conservation of books and documents.

Our mission to assist others has not ended and we ensure that the continuity of guidance in the field of preservation of books, documents and family heritage will be kept alive.














Follow us:

FACEBOOK UNCGPreservationServices

BLOG    http://uncgpreservation.blogspot.com

TWITTER   @UNCGPRESERV 



UNCG Libraries Diversity and Inclusion Blog

Strategic Plan Update

Wed, 27 Jul 2016 20:39:00 +0000



The Diversity Committee has submitted a two-year update to the University Libraries Diversity Strategic Plan. University Libraries’ diversity activities and action items for 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 are highlighted in the update report. We are grateful to the University Libraries’ faculty and staff for their continuing generous support of our Diversity Strategic Plan.

Download and view the report here.

Friends of the UNCG Libraries

The Friends of the UNCG Libraries are advocates and supporters of the Libraries. Our Friends make a real difference in our ability to serve the campus and the local community.

Libraries' Preservation Services Develops Instructional Videos

Mon, 22 Aug 2016 18:17:00 +0000

The UNCG University Libraries 2015-16 Innovation Grant was awarded to Isabella Baltar of the Libraries' Preservation Services Division for her project "No Boundaries in Preservation."  Mrs. Baltar used the funds to develop instructional videos and posters on basic preservation and conservation of books and documents.  A native of Brazil, Mrs. Baltar created the materials in English, Spanish and Portuguese to make the information available to a wide range of communities within the United State and Latin countries. They cover topics such as preventing water disasters, cleaning books and paper, best practices for small digitization projects, brittle paper repair and archival storage enclosures.

The videos and posters are available to everyone -- hence "No Boundaries!"

Click here for more information and to view the videos and posters.

For more information please contact Isabella Balthar at ibaltar@uncg.edu

New DVDs at UNCG

Check-in to see which new DVDs are hitting the shelves in Jackson Library!

New DVDs

Wed, 10 Aug 2016 16:53:00 +0000


North Carolina Literary Map Blog

Bookmarks Festival 2016

Thu, 18 Aug 2016 14:29:00 +0000

John Grisham.  Kate DiCamillo.  Colson Whitehead.  Karen Robards.  What do all of these famous authors have in common?  They are all scheduled to appear at the upcoming Bookmarks Festival!  This four-day event runs from Thursday to Sunday, September 8-11, in downtown Winston-Salem, North Carolina.  Book and poetry readings, writers' workshops, and book signings with award-winning authors are just a few of the many events being offered.  For more information, please visit the Bookmarks Festival website.  Hope to see you there!




UNCG Special Collections & University Archives

SCUA collects, preserves, and makes accessible rare, unique, or otherwise significant materials outside the scope of the general UNCG library collection. We also deliver presentations, classes, tours, and exhibits. Our collections include official records, personal manuscripts, rare books, textiles, A/V materials and artifacts. Subject strengths include women's history, literature, theatre, music, and dance.

Hop into History!

Mon, 22 Aug 2016 19:23:00 +0000

On Thursday, September 15 from 5pm until 7pm, archivists from UNCG will be at Gibb’s Hundred Brewing Company in Downtown Greensboro to launch the new monthly "Hop into History
 series with an exhibit on the local civil rights landscape in the 1950s and 1960s.



Come see the typewriter used by one of the first African American students to enroll at UNCG in Fall 1956, a scrapbook created by Curly Harris (the manager of Woolworth’s during the 1960 sit ins), a flyer distributed by students leading a boycott of segregated businesses on Tate Street in 1963, materials from the Black Power Forum held at UNCG in November 1967, and more.

We’ll also have coloring pages for the kids and even some doggie treats for any visiting history hounds. HISTORY IS FOR EVERYONE! We hope you’ll join us for this great opportunity to learn more about your local history and archives while enjoying your favorite beer! Baconessence food truck will be at the taproom too, so you can plan to have your dinner as well!

For more information and updates, see the Hop into History Event page on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/events/171257499949673/.


UNCG Special Collections & University Archives

Photos and other fun stuff from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives in the University Libraries. You can also follow us on Twitter: @UNCGArchives!

Members of #UNCG’s Science Fiction Fantasy Federation...

Tue, 23 Aug 2016 15:00:52 -0400



Members of #UNCG’s Science Fiction Fantasy Federation (SF3) in the 1988 Pine Needles yearbook. SF3 ran their 13th annual StellarCon that year. They also held their 3rd HexaCon gaming convention in Fall 1987.


Scholarly Communications and Data Services at UNCG

UNCG University Libraries and ECU Joyner Library were awarded a joint grant to help faculty to use alternative textbooks in their courses

Mon, 11 Jul 2016 15:22:00 +0000

A grant from the State Library of North Carolina will aid students at East Carolina University and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro by reducing their costs for required textbooks. The grant is part of the Library Services and Technology Act and is made possible by LSTA grant funding from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal grant-making agency. The State Library of North Carolina, a Division of the Department of Cultural Resources, awarded a grant to librarians from J.Y. Joyner Library at ECU and Jackson Library at UNCG to develop a two-pronged approach to Alternative Textbooks. Including matching funds from both universities, the  total cost of the two-year project is $184,332. 

Sharing best practices, procedures, and promotional materials, the librarians at both institutions will work with departmental faculty to reduce students' textbook costs and increase their academic engagement through two concurrent strategies. One strategy is to award departmental faculty mini-grants to adopt, adapt, or create Open Educational Resources (OER's) as the bases for their syllabi. The second strategy is to identify required texts that either the library already owns or can purchase as ebooks that students may use in addition to or instead of a printed copy that they purchase.  
Textbook affordability is a personal goal for Joyner Library director Janice S. Lewis, as well as a library goal. She is looking forward, she says, to working with colleagues at UNCG's Jackson Library on "our cooperative efforts to provide high quality educational resources to students while saving them money." Kathy Crowe, Interim Dean for the UNCG’s University Libraries, says “We are delighted to have the opportunity to enhance and build on our OER initiatives at UNCG and broaden the scope across the state.”  Student response to a UNCG pilot program was equally enthusiastic; one student commented "I believe that this method of teaching is great, and I have learned just as much as I would using a textbook."   

The Alternative Textbooks Project benefits to students include a reduction in the cost of attending college and increased opportunities for engagement and academic success in their classes. Studies of student achievement across multiple colleges and universities have suggested that students in OER  classes take more classes, have higher retention rates and shorter times to degree, and have learning outcomes equivalent to or slightly higher than students in classes with traditional textbooks.   

Any OER objects created will be made freely available to a global audience, and planning documents, procedures, and promotional materials will be shared with other libraries so that they can adopt this model for their own campuses. For more information, contact any of our co-principal investigators: Cindy Shirkey or Joseph Thomas from East Carolina University, or Beth Bernhardt from UNC Greensboro.   



Spartan Stories

Tales from the University Archives at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Behind the Scenes of State Normal with Lula Martin McIver, part two

Mon, 22 Aug 2016 13:00:00 +0000

In last week's Spartan Stories blog post, we looked at the early life of Lula Martin McIver, wife of the State Normal and Industrial School's (now UNCG) founding president Charles Duncan McIver. This week we will explore her role as the first lady of State Normal and her continued influence on education in North Carolina.

In 1892, the McIvers moved to Greensboro after Charles was named president of the newly-established State Normal and Industrial School (now UNCG). As the campus's First Lady, Lula took on numerous responsibilities. She took charge of selecting furnishings for the sole dormitory on campus at the time and attending to much of the campus landscaping and beautification projects. She also was responsible for advocating for the hiring of Dr. Miriam Bitting as the campus's first physician, insisting at a woman's college needed a female medical doctor in charge of the health of the students.

McIver family in 1900
Also, on the frequent occasions when Charles was away from campus, Lula stepped in to handle much of the school's business. She would give a quiz for a Civics class or monitor the campus coal supply or advise with the College Physician about a threatened measles epidemic. She frequently served as a host for guests waiting to meet with Charles, and she often served as a mother figure for the students. In a 1944 memorial tribute, the Board of Trustees of the UNC Consolidated System noted that "her mother's heart embraced the increasing number of young students who were leaving home for the first time and made the McIver home a center of gracious hospitality."

Lula also became a staunch advocate for increased state support for education in North Carolina. She was a founding member of the Woman's Betterment Association, which specifically worked for improved facilities for public schools in the state. Lula assisted county leaders throughout the state, and at one time served as a field director. Only four years after the creation of the Woman's Betterment Association, 1,133 new school buildings were constructed in rural areas across North Carolina at a cost of $490,272. The total value of the entirety of public school property across the state almost doubled in that short four-year period.

Charles died in September 1906, but Lula and her four children remained in the McIver house on the State Normal campus. The two oldest McIver children - Annie and Charlie - were among the ten students enrolled at the first practice school on the State Normal campus. Annie went on to graduate from State Normal in 1905. Their youngest daughter, who was also named Lula, was a member of the Class of 1921 at the institution her parents founded. Charles, Jr. graduated from his father's alma mater, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in 1909. A fourth child, Verlinda, died at a young age in 1908.

Lula Martin McIver,
pictured in the 1921 Pine Needles yearbook
Lula continued to be an active presence on campus, and remained a strong advocate of a number of social causes, including the YWCA, Sunday Schools, the community Art Association, and educational institutions for both white and African American students in the state. Lula suffered a broken hip in 1930 and was wheelchair bound, limiting her ability to be as active as she had been before. But she still attended the annual Founder's Day ceremony on campus every October.

On December 22, 1944, Lula Martin McIver passed away at age 80. At the Founder's Day service the following October, college president Walter Clinton Jackson noted that "death last December broke Mrs. McIver's long connection with this College, but death cannot remove her benevolent spirit from this campus not can it stop the force which she, working with and through her husband, started for the advancement of educational opportunity for women in North Carolina." That year, students placed wreaths on both the graves of Charles and Lula McIver as part of the Founder's Day ceremony, "conscious of the fact that Dr. McIver himself would feel that this was indeed a just and proper recognition of one who may rightfully be called the co-founder of the College."

UNCG's Dataland

UNCG's land of data releases, new data sources, fun stats information, and much more!

New ICPSR project: Civic Learning, Engagement, and Action Data Sharing (CivicLEADS)

Thu, 18 Aug 2016 14:40:00 +0000

ICPSR is proud to announce the launch of Civic Learning, Engagement, and Action Data Sharing (CivicLEADS). Funded by a grant from the Spencer Foundation, CivicLEADS provides a centralized repository for data produced by the multi-disciplinary research surrounding civic education and action. Beyond facilitating the sharing and discovery of data, CivicLEADS seeks to create a learning community around civic education and engagement research.