Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives

Current Exhibits

A Testimony through Music: The Compositions of Lev Aronson. Cellist, Teacher, and Holocaust Survivor

Mon, 03 Oct 2016 18:00:00 +0000

Lev Aronson is remembered as a distinguished cellist, teacher, and survivor of the Holocaust. Born February 7, 1912 in München Gladbach (now Mönchengladbach), Germany, the story of Aronson’s life and music serve as inspiration for countless students and fans, well beyond his death in 1988. With his family forced from their home in Latvia during World War I and losing five years of his life to the camps of World War II, Aronson endured one of the darkest times in human history, surviving these events to bring beauty to the world through music.

The exhibit “A Testimony through Music: The Compositions of Lev Aronson” conveys the story of his Aronson’s life through his sheet music, the collection of which is available for research at the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections & University Archives at Jackson Library. This exhibit features several musical manuscripts, composed by Aronson, relating to his experiences in the Nazi and Russian labor camps. Included among these pieces are vocal works in Yiddish focused upon his experiences during the war, as well as two concert pieces for cello composed by Aronson and signed with his inmate identification number. The exhibit will be available for viewing from October 3rd, 2016 to March 31st, 2017.

Hop into History!

Mon, 22 Aug 2016 19:23:00 +0000

On Thursday, September 15 from 5pm until 7pm, archivists from UNCG will be at Gibb’s Hundred Brewing Company in Downtown Greensboro to launch the new monthly "Hop into History
 series with an exhibit on the local civil rights landscape in the 1950s and 1960s.

Come see the typewriter used by one of the first African American students to enroll at UNCG in Fall 1956, a scrapbook created by Curly Harris (the manager of Woolworth’s during the 1960 sit ins), a flyer distributed by students leading a boycott of segregated businesses on Tate Street in 1963, materials from the Black Power Forum held at UNCG in November 1967, and more.

We’ll also have coloring pages for the kids and even some doggie treats for any visiting history hounds. HISTORY IS FOR EVERYONE! We hope you’ll join us for this great opportunity to learn more about your local history and archives while enjoying your favorite beer! Baconessence food truck will be at the taproom too, so you can plan to have your dinner as well!

For more information and updates, see the Hop into History Event page on Facebook:

Learning from Medieval Manuscripts

Thu, 14 Jul 2016 16:28:00 +0000

On exhibit in the Hodges Reading room in Jackson Library

“Learning from Medieval Manuscripts”

The University Libraries is fortunate to have in its collections, “Fifty Original Leaves from Medieval Manuscripts.  Western Europe: XII-XVI Century”, a portfolio collection created by Otto F. Ege in the 1940’s, a professor of art history and dean of the Cleveland Institute of Art.  His intent through these portfolios was to provide opportunity for many to view and learn from these individual leaves. 

The selected leaves span through several centuries and across countries, taken from imperfect volumes from Otto Ege’s personal collection.  These manuscripts have provided the university community rare and special opportunities to view first hand historical documents that illustrate a time before mechanical printing was introduced. 

Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives  has made available these medieval manuscripts to university faculty and students through teaching opportunities and research.  Through the years the original storage has become less than perfect.  The preservation division was able to design and create new protective enclosures for these portfolio items to ensure their conservation for the future. 

The exhibit documents the construction of the new enclosures and provides a view of several of the leaves from the collections, presenting some interesting historical facts regarding the creation of medieval manuscripts.

-Audrey Sage

More Exhibits »