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UNCG University Libraries Announcements

Experience the Horror of ...

Thu, 18 Oct 2018 20:10:00 +0000

Don't miss the annual Halloween experience in the Digital Media Commons on October 31, 2018, from 3 - 5 p.m. in the Lower Level of Jackson Library. There will be spooky treats, virtual reality games, a costume contest with prizes and a greenscreen for UNCG students!

UNCG Libraries Diversity and Inclusion Blog

Celebration of the Legacy of Richard Berry Harrison at NCA&T

Mon, 22 Oct 2018 16:33:00 +0000

Dear Faculty and Staff at W. C. Jackson Library,

I want to invite you to a very special event on the North Carolina A&T State University campus this Friday, October 26th, from 4pm to 6pm to honor the legacy of Richard B. Harrison.

Mr. Harrison (1864-1935) was a noted orator, stage actor, and probably North Carolina A&T's most famous faculty member. He became nationally famous as "De Lawd" in the Pulitzer winning play "The Green Pastures". His tremendous fame for the role earned him the key to the city of Greensboro in 1934, the cover of Time magazine (the first for an African American), and an honorary doctorate from North Carolina A&T.

At Friday's event, (in the Harrison Auditorium, dedicated in his memory in 1939) there will be performances by the Richard B. Harrison Players, historical reflections, and rare footage of Harrison from the University of South Carolina's Moving Image Research Collection (MIRC).

This event is presented by the Richard B. Harrison Players and the F. D. Bluford Library. We would be delighted to have anyone from the Jackson Library attend.

Best,

James Stewart

James R. Stewart Jr.
Archives and Special Collections Librarian
F. D. Bluford Library
North Carolina A&T State University
jrstewa1@ncat.edu
(336) 285-4188



Harold Schiffman Music Library at UNCG

HSML Shiffminions Fall 2018!

Thu, 27 Sep 2018 17:34:00 +0000

Schiffminions Fall 2018

Here they are in a group and individually below. These amazing young people are the cool Schiffminions of the HSML for the Fall semester of 2018. Yes, this is the traditional post for the year. (Maybe more coming? We shall see.) Alaina, Evan and I are so grateful to you all and we are so lucky to be working with you! You ROCK!

Group shot of all the smiling faces at the August opening meeting in the DMC of the Big House (AKA Jackson Library):


And alphabetically by first name because...librarian!


Alyssa




Asher




Candice




Cassie




Emma




Endia




Hannah




James




James




Jessica




Jocy




Karizma




Lysha




Maddy




Miesha




Risha




Sarai




Vini



And...the Schiffminion Management Team:




Alaina




Evan




Sarah


How lucky we are! 

Librarian Recommended: Electronic Resources at UNCG

The place to discover library tools for your research and class.

Credo Reference: Start Your Research Here!

Thu, 18 Oct 2018 19:11:00 +0000

Credo Referenceis a one-stop research platform that combines authoritative reference content with first-class and highly intuitive search capabilities. Resources include encyclopedias, dictionaries, atlases, images, audio files and videos in numerous subject areas.  Over two million full text articles are available to Credo Referenceusers from subject areas across many key academic disciplines,
including:

  • Arts and leisure
  • Business, finance and economics
  • Education
  • Health and medicine
  • History
  • Language and Literature
  • Psychology
  • Science, technology and engineering
  • Social Sciences

Searches can be initiated from the Credo Reference web page search box as a basic search, image search, title search, or Mind Map, which can be used to find related terms and expand your search in an intuitive way. Simply enter a keyword and select Mind Map. 


Your search word is displayed, while other words that appear around it are conceptually related. Each related word in the Mind Map can then be broken down into smaller topics by clicking on it. The Mind Map can help you refine or expand your search.

New DVDs at UNCG

Check-in to see which new DVDs are hitting the shelves in Jackson Library!

New DVDs

Tue, 16 Oct 2018 19:34:00 +0000

ACTION
Sicario. Day of the soldado
Adrift
Skyscraper

ANIMATED
Hotel Transylvania 3

DOCUMENTARY
Three identical strangers
Diana, our mother : her life and legacy
Recuperando el paraíso = Recovering paradise
Spielberg

DRAMA
Leave no trace
Don't worry, he won't get far on foot

THRILLER
The first purge
Hotel Artemis

TV
Divorce. The complete second season 
The great British baking show. Season 5

UNCG Libraries Suggestion Box

See responses to your suggestions here!

Spartan Card Machine

Mon, 22 Oct 2018 15:08:00 +0000

You said:  Please fix the "done" button on the Spartan Card machine in Jackson Library.

The SpartanCard Center is responsible for this machine. They have indicated to us that they do not plan to fix the button.  All methods for putting money on your card are here. 

North Carolina Literary Map Blog

F. Scott Fitzgerald's 112nd Birthday

Tue, 25 Sep 2018 19:31:00 +0000

Monday, September 24th, was F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 112nd birthday. Best known for his classic book, The Great Gatsby, those who haven’t had the chance to visit Western Carolina may not know that Fitzgerald had ties to our state.

During the summers of 1935 and 1936, Fitzgerald stayed in Asheville, North Carolina to rest after contracting tuberculosis. Western Carolina had become a popular destination for such getaways, as the mountain air was thought to be good for the lungs. Fitzgerald stayed at the renown Grove Park Inn, and rented out two rooms: one for working, the other for writing. The summers spent there were a low period in his life. Fitzgerald was reportedly trying to cure his addiction to gin with what was known as the “beer cure,” and wrote short stories to pay debts and bills. One story written at that time, “I’d Die for You (The Legend of Lake Lure),” was set in Western NC and featured a young actress who had come to the area to star in a movie. He left North Carolina in 1937, heading west to Hollywood with the hopes of reigniting his career. His wife, Zelda, remained in the southeast, traveling between Asheville’s Highland Hospital for treatment and her mother’s home in Montgomery, Alabama.

"I'd Die for You (The Legend of Lake Lure)" and other lesser-known Fitzgerald short stories can be read in the book I'd Die for You: And Other Lost Stories. Find it and other Fitzgerald classics at your local bookstore or library. The North Carolina Literary Map also now features a tour of Fitzgerald’s life in Western NC, that may serve as a guide for tourists or may be explored virtually. Discover more about our state's literary heritage today!



UNCG Special Collections & University Archives

Photos and other fun stuff from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives in the University Libraries. You can also follow us on Twitter: @UNCGArchives!

What’s more in the spirit of #Halloween than “Little...

Tue, 23 Oct 2018 14:00:34 -0400



What’s more in the spirit of #Halloween than “Little Shop of Horrors”? This herald is from the 1983 production that ran off-Broadway in New York City and contains some iconic art. From the Robert C. Hansen Performing Arts Collection. Visit http://go.uncg.edu/hansen to learn more about the Hansen Collection.


Spartan Stories

Tales from the University Archives at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Student Life at Ye Junior Shoppe

Mon, 22 Oct 2018 13:00:00 +0000

Today, UNCG students can find small shops selling snacks and other sundries in various places across campus. But in the earlier years of the university, the on-campus shopping options were significantly fewer - and often run by the students themselves.

In 1913, the junior class decided to raise money to support their annual banquet and dance through sale of hot soup, hot chocolate, and sandwiches from a small basement kitchenette in the Curry Building. Both college students and students at the Curry School were able to purchase these lunches. Each item cost five cents. This was a time consuming job, however, and in the late 1910s, they shifted their focus to a small stand in the campus post office that sold pennants, hairnets, and other small items. The stand, which was dubbed Ye Junior Shoppe, also served as a site for coordinating the development of film.

Entrance to the Junior Shoppe,
Administration Building (now Foust)
Dormitory-based shops were the next evolution in student-led campus stores. One junior in each dormitory would serve as an in-residence sales person for high-demand items like hairpins. The stand in the campus post office continued as well. A poem in the January 22, 1921 issue of The Carolinian student newspaper advertised the shop:

Patronize "Ye Junior Shoppe" at all times,
Save up your nickles and your dimes,
To buy of its many wares and novelties,
You can get necessities and frivolities,
And too, it is so near at hand;
Right in the post office is the Junior Stand.

In the 1922-1923 school year, President Julius Foust allowed the junior class to open a formal store in a designated location on campus. The shop operated in some years in the Students' Building; in others it had a space in the Administration Building (now Foust). They sold items including snacks, camera film, hair nets, picture postcards of campus, memory books, and college rings. In its first year of operation, the shop made a profit of $800.

Over the years, the inventory of the store grew.. In 1931, the shop installed tables and chairs and began selling sandwiches and cold drinks. By the mid-1940s, it was so successful that the store's annual profit grew to nearly $12,000. In a 1990 oral history interview, Margaret Daniel Wilkerson Thurston (class of 1949) noted, "the room probably should have held twenty people, and there would be two hundred in there." Chancellor Walter Clinton Jackson argued that this was more money than the junior class needed, so, in 1945, the college took over operations of the shop.

Students at the Soda Shop, 1955
Renamed the Soda Shop, it moved in 1948 into a new building on College Avenue. This building was located on the former site of the Wooden Dormitory (also known as Little Guilford), which had just been demolished. Profits from the Soda Shop were used to finance student scholarships.

1949 also saw the demolition of the old Students' Building and, soon after, the construction of the new Elliott Hall, which opened in 1953. In the early 1960s, Elliott Hall added a small cafeteria, which was also known as the Soda Shop. The next-door soda shop building was then transformed into a faculty center in 1963.

UNCG's Dataland

UNCG's land of data releases, new data sources, fun stats information, and much more!

ICPSR Data Fair!

Tue, 02 Oct 2018 16:50:00 +0000

Join me at ICPSR's Data Fair 2018 - “Data: Powered By You.”

We'll learn about current trends and best practices in data transparency, data activism, what to do with data, and more! 

October 1-5, entirely virtual and free to all. 

Learn morehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1x_bSPaU0uE 




UNCG Digital Collections

Digital collections news from UNCG University Libraries

Digital collections priorities, 2018-2019

Tue, 25 Sep 2018 16:27:00 +0000

New projects


People Not Property: Slave Deeds of North Carolina
A collaborative endeavor between the UNCG University Libraries, North Carolina Division of Archives and Records, and North Carolina Registers of Deeds among others. Working as an addition to and evolution of the Digital Library on American Slavery, the project is leading towards a unique, centralized database of bills of sales indexing the names of enslaved people from across North Carolina.When complete, People Not Property will include robust metadata, high resolution images, and full-text searchable transcripts. We hope to open the project to states beyond North Carolina, creating a central location for accessing and researching slave deeds from across the Southern United States.

Photos and Concert Programs of the UNCG Cello Music Collection
The proposed project is to digitize photographs and concert programs from 4 of the Cello Music Collections: Luigi Silva, Elizabeth Cowling, Rudolf Matz, and Ennio Bolognini. The digitization of these materials would enhance the existing cello digital music collections. The concert programs would allow researchers to track the performance careers of these cellists, and the photographs would add a visually appealing component to the collection, which would make the collection more attractive to non-musicians.

Bryan School Annual Reports
Digitize the Bryan School's annual reports to the Provost, from 1969-70 to 2003-04. The Bryan School will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of its founding in the 2019-2020 academic year.

UNCG Graduate, Summer Session, and Extension Bulletins
Digitization of the bound graduate, summer session, and extension course bulletins. These will complement the undergraduate bulletins that were digitized several years ago, providing a complete picture of courses offered at UNCG since its founding. This will allow researchers to learn about these programs offered outside of the standard undergraduate curriculum.

Ongoing projects