Race and Slavery Petitions Project

Search Results

Your subject search returned 12 total results.

PAR Number 11682105

State: Virginia Year: 1821
Location: Jefferson Location Type: County

Abstract: After serving Thomas Campbell for more than forty-five years, the slave Roger was freed by the last will of testament of Campbell's son, John Campbell, who had inherited him from his father. However, soon after acquiring his right to freedom, Roger was re-enslaved by the late John's brother, Thomas Campbell Jr., and remained in slavery for approximately two more years. Roger brought suit in the county court and his freedom was confirmed. Now he faces the prospect of having to emigrate as required by the law. Old and infirm he would certainly suffer greatly in "some distant and unknown land." The petitioner has inherited a large part of John Campbell's estate and he is "willing to be the security of the said Roger that he shall never become a burden to the public and to give further security if deem'd necessary to support him during his natural life, as he believes that himself and his family are now enjoying the fruits of the labour of said Roger."

PAR Number 11682106

State: Virginia Year: 1821
Location: Jefferson Location Type: County

Abstract: As "freeholders in the neighborhood where the within named Roger has been for many years, and having been personally acquainted with him," fifteen citizens of Jefferson County assert, "do hereby certify the we consider him to be man of good character, that he is both honest and industrious, and have never heard of any blame being attached to him whatever." According to the petitioners, Roger was "unjustly inslaved by Thomas Campbell Jr., and with much difficulty and expense he has extricated himself therefrom, and being now in the decline of life," it is unfortunate that he must be compeled to leave his home, and his family, as the law requires of emancipated slaves. The petitioners support the offer of John C. Green, who, in a related petition, had asked the legislature to authorize Roger to remain in the state and offered guarantees that he would never become a public burden. The related petition relates the circumstances of Roger's emancipation and who had owned him before he was freed.

PAR Number 11682803

State: Virginia Year: 1828
Location: Accomack Location Type: County

Abstract: The petitioner Littleton P. Henderson informs the court that in 1826 he purchased at auction of the Overseers of the Poor a free man of color named Jim Outten, who had been re-enslaved for failing to leave the state within the time prescribed by law. He paid fifty dollars. Shortly thereafter, Jim Outten filed a suit to recover his freedom and won. Henderson then presented a petition to the General Assembly, following which he learned that he had been accused of being a speculator in slaves. Littleton vigorously denies such accusation and reiterates his claim that he is entitled to reimbursement of his fifty dollars.

PAR Number 20784507

State: Kentucky Year: 1845
Location: Jefferson Location Type: County

Abstract: Charlotte, a woman of color, states that she was freed by the last will and testament of her former owner, James Robeson. William Trigg, owner of her husband, "induced" her and her children to move to Kentucky with him, "under his pledge solemnly made that he would protect them in all their rights as free people." Trigg has acted "in bad faith," and she and her children are now threatened with being sold back into slavery as Trigg "has already brought a negro buyer to inspect her for purchase." Charlotte asks for an injunction against Trigg to prevent him from selling her and that she and her nine minor-aged children be declared free.

PAR Number 20986503

State: Maryland Year: 1865
Location: Frederick Location Type: County

Abstract: William and Samuel Joyce petition that prior to "the adoption of the present Constitution of the State of Maryland," they were held as slaves by Mary Whalen. But, "by the 24th Art. of the declaration of rights annexed to said Constitution," they were released from their "former obligations as slaves." However, the petitioners claim that they are still detained in slavery by Mary Whalen. They ask the court to issue a writ of habeas corpus so that their case can be heard in court and Whalen "can show cause if any she may have, why your petitioners are thus deprived of their freedom."

PAR Number 20986507

State: Maryland Year: 1865
Location: Frederick Location Type: County

Abstract: William Henry Brown, a free man of color, petitions that his son, Isaac Brown, is unlawfully detained as a slave by Arthur Delashmutt. Brown maintains that "by virtue of the provisions of the New Constitution of the State of Maryland," Isaac Brown became free. However, Delashmutt "refuses to give him up to Your Petitioner ... his natural guardian." He asks for a writ of habeas corpus "compelling the said Arthur Delashmutt to deliver the said Isaac Brown to Your Petitioner."

PAR Number 21200008

State: North Carolina Year: 9999
Location: Craven Location Type: County

Abstract: Twenty-three-year-old free born mulatto Ailce Williams seeks to be released from her "cruel Servitude" at the hands of Peter Conway who detains her as a servant although she never signed an indenture or "any other Instrument."

PAR Number 21277501

State: North Carolina Year: 1775
Location: Craven Location Type: County

Abstract: In 1769, on a voyage from Cuba to Jamaica, free black sailor Antonio Muray loaned a fellow sailor, John Taylor, a pistol. Arriving in Jamaica, Muray demanded its return but Taylor refused. The two men fought and Muray, "being a Black man was taken up at the Instance or Complaint of the Said John Taylor" and jailed. Antonio was then sold as an indentured servant to one Timothy Clear who paid his jail fees. Antonio charges that Clear gave him "unmerciful whipings frequently for six years." Finally, Clear sold Antonio's time of indenture to one Thomas Parson. Parsons still holds him in bondage and also treats him cruelly. Muray petitions for his freedom.

PAR Number 21279808

State: North Carolina Year: 1798
Location: Chowan Location Type: County

Abstract: A number of years ago, Dick Dingley, then a slave, entered into an agreement with Ichabod Jordan. According to the terms of the agreement, Jordan would purchase Dingley from his previous owner, James Leggett, and emancipate him upon reimbursement of the purchase price by Dingley. Dingley charges that Jordan did purchase him from Legett, was reimbursed for the purchase price, and effected the emancipation. This happened more than three years ago. However, Jordan is now reneging on the deal. According to Dingley, Jordan has obtained the bill of sale from Legett and "sets up a Claim, to your petitioner as a slave, and so harasses and disturbs him, that he cannot with safety pursue his lawful business." He asks the court to confirm his freedom.

PAR Number 21279809

State: North Carolina Year: 1798
Location: Chowan Location Type: County

Abstract: Residents of Chowan County say that they know Dick Dingley, a man who purchased his freedom from Ishabod Jordan and was set free by the latter three years ago, is a "Peaceable fellow & behaves himself orde[r]ly & to the Satisfaction of all his neighborhood." Ichabod Jordan, they charge, is trying to reclaim Dick as his slave, and they ask the court to redress the wrong.

PAR Number 21279810

State: North Carolina Year: 1798
Location: Chowan Location Type: County

Abstract: Dick Dingley charges that Ichabod Jordan, who promised to allow him to purchase himself, reneged on the bargain and claims him as a slave. "Jordan has Renewed his Clame & has most Cruely Beaten your Petitioner," Dingley explains, and "does all he Can to keep him the Said Petitioner in Slavery." Dingley asks the court to affirm his status as a free person.

PAR Number 21286202

State: North Carolina Year: 1862
Location: Robeson Location Type: County

Abstract: In 1857, free black Jacob Goins was indicted and convicted of petty larceny in Cumberland County for stealing an iron pot worth six pence. Sentenced to be hired out for five years, Goins fell into the hands of slave trader D. J. Southerland, who "frequently offered his negroes for sale & persons came & examined him with a view to purchasing him." Believing it was Southerland's intention to sell him "into perpetual slavery," he escaped. Now under arrest as a fugitive, he seeks a writ of habeas corpus.