Race and Slavery Petitions Project

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PAR Number 11380302

State: South Carolina Year: 1803
Location: Abbeville Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Samuel Harris seeks compensation for his twenty-year-old slave Harry, who was killed 26 March 1802 by "the fall of a tree" while working on the public road from Vienna to Abbeville Courthouse. Harris "entreats your honorable body to take into consideration his unfortunate case and begs that you would allow compensation for the property aforesaid which he has lost in the public service." Harry, "a good field hand and a tolerable good blacksmith," was valued at $600.

PAR Number 11380401

State: South Carolina Year: 1804
Location: Edgefield Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Cradock Burnell seeks compensation for his slave Adam, "who was convicted of Robbery from the Dwelling House in the day time and hath since been executed in pursuance of his sentence." Reporting that Adam’s appraised value was $250, the petitioner "prays your Honble House to grant him such compensation as your Honble House shall seem meet."

PAR Number 11380402

State: South Carolina Year: 1804
Location: Edgefield Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Cradock Burnell seeks compensation for his slave Adam, "who was convicted of Robbery from the Dwelling House in the day time and hath since been executed in pursuance of his sentence." Reporting that Adam’s appraised value was $250, the petitioner "prays your Honorable House to grant him such compensation as your Honble House shall seem meet."

PAR Number 11380403

State: South Carolina Year: 1804

Abstract: William Royall seeks compensation for Jack, his "valuable Negro fellow about 30 Years of Age who was lately prosecuted convicted & executed for the Murder of a Negro woman [Beck] also belonging to Your Petitioner." Royall admits that the "loss of two such Prime Hands is Particularly hard and unfortunate to Your Petitioner whose pecuniary circumstances are by no means eligible." He therefore prays that "Your Honble Body not to make any deduction from the inconsiderable Sum of two Hundred Dollars," which is what the Court of Magistrates and Freeholders assessed Jack's value to be.

PAR Number 11380701

State: South Carolina Year: 1807
Location: Colleton Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: William McCants seeks compensation for the slave Daniel, who was killed "by the falling of a tree" while working on a public road. Lamenting that he has sustained "heavy damage in the loss” of said slave," McCants trusts in "the liberality of your honorable body" and prays that he will be granted "such relief as in Your Wisdom Shall be thought proper."

PAR Number 11380901

State: South Carolina Year: 1809
Location: Colleton Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Charles C. Ashe seeks compensation for a twenty-two-year-old slave named Monday, who "hath been tried convicted and executed for Burglary in Sept 1804"; he was also convicted of "taking a gun and ammunition & swearing he would kill a Certain Negroe fellow" belonging to Mary Crofts. Avowing that Monday "was of great utility in aiding him in his planting interest," the petitioner hopes "that there will be some alleviation of his loss." He therefore prays that "such allowance be made unto your petitioner as to your honorable Body shall seem competent with propriety." The "Justices of the Quorum" assessed Monday's value to be $400.

PAR Number 11380902

State: South Carolina Year: 1809

Abstract: John Rose seeks compensation for his slave, Tybee, who was convicted and executed for burglary in 1806. Rose recounts that he previously petitioned the state senate in 1807 for relief and that he included an appraisal from the Court of Justices and Freeholders for $128 with said petition; however, when he inquired as to the outcome of his prayer, he was told that his request had been held up in committee because "The Record of the Trial is wanting." Believing that said appraisement "must be by some means lost or mislaid," the petitioner now submits an affidavit attesting "that a Record of the same accompanied with an appraisement did actually exist." Rose seeks "such relief as may be just & right."

PAR Number 11380903

State: South Carolina Year: 1809
Location: Orangeburgh Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Timothy Barton seeks compensation for his slave named Jack, who "was arrested for wounding and maiming a white man by the name of William Fairey, and by a Court of Justices and freeholders was tried for his life and was sentenced to be executed for the same." Citing that Jack was valued at $400 before his death, the petitioner "prays your Honorable body to make such provision for his indemnity as you may think him entitled to." The court sentenced Jack “to be hanged by the neck for ten minutes and afterwards that his Body should be burnt.”

PAR Number 11380905

State: South Carolina Year: 1809
Location: Orangeburgh Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Timothy Barton seeks compensation for his slave named Jack, who "was arrested for wounding and maiming a white man by the name of William Fairey, and by a Court of Justices and freeholders was tried for his life and was sentenced to be executed for the Same." Citing that Jack was valued at $400 before his death, the petitioner "prays your Honorable body to make such provision for his Indemnity as you may think him entitled to."

PAR Number 11381001

State: South Carolina Year: 1810
Location: Pendleton Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Capt. James Anderson seeks compensation for a sixteen-year-old slave named Wiley, who was "taken in the act" of burglary. Anderson reports that Wiley was "brought to him tied as a prisoner" and that he informed said slave that "he would be tried for his life"; if convicted of "the crime of which he was guilty," Wiley would be executed. The petitioner recounts that, "when the family rose from bed" the next morning, they discovered that "he the sd. Negroe boy had Hanged himself With the Rope he Was tied With When delivered to him." Anderson prays that he be granted "the same compensation as if he had been executed for the above offence." Wiley's appraised value was $400.

PAR Number 11381202

State: South Carolina Year: 1812
Location: Darlington Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Andrew Muldrow Sr. seeks compensation for "a negro fellow named Bristoe executed for the crime of Burglary" in 1810. He recalls that "he has heretofore petitioned your honorable body to obtain the compensation allowed by law when a negro is executed & has never as yet received any." The petitioner therefore prays that he be granted "such relief" as is deemed meet. The court found Bristol was worth "two hundred pounds current money" before "they ordered the execution of the said negro."

PAR Number 11381304

State: South Carolina Year: 1813
Location: Barnwell Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Murphy, approximately fifty-five years old, laments that his two slaves died when rafts carrying timber, which they were conducting for Murphy, were blown from the Ashley River by a wind of "great violence from the Northeast, which drove them to sea." He recounts that "it being in the night they were not able to get any assistance and accordingly perished," adding that "this incident happened on the night of the 11th of December last, when the weather was extremely cold." Murphy notes that said slaves "were seen adrift by a guard Vessel which was stationed near fort Jackson, but who did not attempt" to retrieve them. The petitioner asserts that the value of the timber and rafts to be $500 and that each slave was "worth at least six or seven hundred Dollars." Noting that he is in debt and that "your Honors have always afforded relief to the unfortunate," the petitioner "trusts that you will not in this instance withhold it from him."

PAR Number 11381305

State: South Carolina Year: 1813
Location: Barnwell Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Murphy, approximately fifty-five years old, laments that his two slaves died when rafts carrying timber, which they were conducting for Murphy, were blown from the Ashley River by a wind of "great violence from the Northeast, which drove them to sea." He recounts that "it being in the night they were not able to get any assistance and accordingly perished," adding that "this incident happened on the night of the 11th of December last, when the weather was extremely cold." Murphy notes that said slaves "were seen adrift by a guard Vessel which was stationed near fort Jackson, but who did not attempt" to retrieve them. The petitioner asserts that the value of the timber and rafts to be $500 and that each slave was "worth at least six or seven hundred Dollars." Noting that he is in debt and that "your Honors have always afforded relief to the unfortunate," the petitioner "trusts that you will not in this instance withhold it from him."

PAR Number 11381402

State: South Carolina Year: 1814
Location: Newberry Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Nicholas Summer seeks compensation for his fifteen-year-old slave, Hannah, who "was charged with house Burning upon which Charge the said negro was tried, convicted and executed." He therefore prays that his case be taken into consideration and that he be granted "such relief in the premises as to you Shall Seem meet." The court "appraised and valued the said negro Woman Hannah at" $350 before "ordering the said sentence to be executed."

PAR Number 11381405

State: South Carolina Year: 1814
Location: Abbeville Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: William Ware states that, on 22 July 1814, his slave Jim was barbarously "stabed & Kiled in attempting to apprehend a Negro fellow who was run away for upwards of three months who had been plundering & Stealing through the neighbourhood for that time." He reports that he ordered Jim and several other slaves "to take him" and that Jim "was kiled in the Act of taking him." Avowing that Jim "was amongst the first class of Negroes," Ware hopes "your Honorable body will take it in consideration" and "Grant your petitioner such Relief as your petitioner thinks he is Intitled to." Ward considers that Jim "was doing a Laudable Act" and "he was obeying my lawful Orders." The appraisers valued Jim at $500.

PAR Number 11381407

State: South Carolina Year: 1814
Location: Edgefield Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Martin Witt states that "his negro man named Ned was in the month of July 1812 Executed for burglary." Declaring that "he is a very poor Man with a family of Children to support," the petitioner prays that his case be taken into consideration and that he be granted "such Compensation for the loss of said negro as in your Wisdom you may seem meet."

PAR Number 11381511

State: South Carolina Year: 1815
Location: Newberry Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Joseph Davenport, a lieutenant in the cavalry, states that he was ordered in March 1814 to begin a three-month tour of duty at Camp Alston. He reports that he took along one of his slaves to assist him "in the discharging of the menial duties." Davenport declares, however, that on the way to said camp Tom "was taken sick and left on the road and shortly after died." The petitioner prays that he be granted compensation for his slave, who was appraised at four hundred dollars and who died "while in the service of the state.”

PAR Number 11381512

State: South Carolina Year: 1815
Location: Newberry Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Joseph Davenport, a lieutenant in the cavalry, states that he was ordered in March 1814 to begin a three-month tour of duty at Camp Alston. He reports that he took along one of his slaves to assist him "in the discharging of the menial duties." Davenport declares, however, that on the way to said camp Tom "was taken sick and left on the road and shortly after died." The petitioner prays that he be granted compensation for his slave, who was appraised at four hundred dollars and who died "while in the service of the state.”

PAR Number 11381514

State: South Carolina Year: 1815
Location: Union Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Twenty-five citizens of Union County seek compensation for Jemima McJunkin. They aver that Capt. Samuel McJunkin was "inhumanly Murdered by his own Negro Man, for which inhuman Act said Negro has been executed agreeable to the Laws of the State." They deplore that by such murder "a worthy Woman has been bereft of a kind indulgent husband; and five children have been deprived of a kind, industrious provident Father -- and by the execution of said Negro (so justly inflicted) they have been deprived of part of the means of their future support." Noting that "by the existing laws of the State no compensation is allowed to the owner of a Slave executed for murder," the petitioners pray that "your Honours will take the case of the said Jemima G. McJunkin and Family into consideration, and grant such compensation as to Justice and humanity doth belong."

PAR Number 11381908

State: South Carolina Year: 1819
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Mathew O'Driscoll states that in 1813 he owned Brister and Gabriel, two slaves "who ran away from him and were harboured by some of their acquaintances" on a certain plantation. He relates that "a detachment of Militia" acting under the authority of a 1794 act of assembly "shot them down and killed them." He reports that he filed his memorial in 1814 "praying remuneration at the hands of the state Treasurer" and that said petition was rejected. He then filed suit against the militia at the Court of Common Pleas wherein the jury returned a verdict: "We find that the negroes Brister and Gabriel the property of Dr Mathew ODriscoll were lawfully killed, by a party of Militia, assembled under the proper officers, and acting according to the provision of the act of one thousand seven hundred and ninety four and we therefore find a Verdict for the Defendants." O'Driscoll avows that his "slaves had been guilty of no offence except against your memorialist; and that only in the venial offence of runing away from his employ." He avers that, "without any fault or neglect" on his part, "the lives of his slaves have been taken away, and his property destroyed under the sanction of the law of the state" and that he is deprived "of any private redress at the hands of those engaged in the said transaction." Noting the values of said slaves to be $600 for Brister and $400 for Gabriel, the petitioner "again submits his case to the consideration of your Honorable body, and prays that compensation may be allowed him by the State."

PAR Number 11381909

State: South Carolina Year: 1819
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Mathew O'Driscoll states that in 1813 he owned Brister and Gabriel, two slaves "who ran away from him & were harboured by some of their acquaintances on a certain plantation." He relates that "a detachment of Militia" acting under the authority of a 1794 act of assembly "shot them down and killed them." He reports that he filed his memorial in 1814 "praying remuneration at the hands of the treasurer of the state" and that said petition was rejected. He then filed suit against the militia at the Court of Common Pleas wherein the jury returned a verdict: "We find that the negroes Brister and Gabriel, the property of Dr. ODriscoll were lawfully killed by a party of the Militia, assembled under the proper officers, and acting according to the provisions of the Act of 1794. And we therefore find a Verdict for the Defendants." O'Driscoll avows that his "said slaves had been guilty of no offence, except against your memorialist; and that only in the venial offence of runing away from his employ." He avers that, "without any fault or neglect" on his part, "the lives of his slaves have been taken away, and his property destroyed under the sanction of the law of the state" and that he is deprived "of any private redress at the hands of those engaged in the said transaction." Noting the values of said slaves to be $600 for Brister and $400 for Gabriel, the petitioner "again submits his case to the consideration of your Honorable body, and prays that compensation may be allowed him by the State."

PAR Number 11382006

State: South Carolina Year: 1820
Location: Williamsburgh Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: David Rodgers seeks compensation for "the untimely death" of his slave Pompey during the summer of 1819. Rodgers recounts that "a pretty large gang, to the number of seven Negroes had associated and imbodied themselves together, committing depredations of various kinds, on the property of the Inhabitants." He further reports that the militia was called out and "it was eventually thought to be, by the Colonel of the Regiment, indispensably necessary, that the People should turn out with Fire Arms and quell the Negroes in their nefarious acts"; as a result, Pompey "was shot dead." Rodgers states that Pompey at the time of his death was between forty and forty-five years old; was worth between nine hundred and one thousand dollars; and was "a good Boat hand, a very prime field hand; a good sawyer, And was quite handy in the use of Mechanical Tools." He also notes that Pompey "had sustained previous to being killed, uniformly, a good character, with the exception of running away once or twice." Rodgers therefore prays that he receive "remuneration for the loss which he has sustained."

PAR Number 11382007

State: South Carolina Year: 1820
Location: Williamsburgh Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: David Rodgers seeks compensation for "the untimely death" of his slave Pompey during the summer of 1819. Rodgers recounts that "a pretty large gang, to the number of seven Negroes, had associated, and imbodied themselves together, committing depredations of various kinds, on the property of the Inhabitants." He further reports that the militia was called out and "it was eventually thought to be, by the Colonel of the Regiment, indispensably necessary, that the People should turn out with Fire Arms, and quell the Negroes in their nefarious acts"; as a result, Pompey "was shot dead." Rodgers states that Pompey at the time of his death was between forty and forty-five years old; was worth between nine hundred and one thousand dollars; and was "a good Boat hand, a very prime field hand; a good Sawyer, And was quite handy in the use of Mechanical Tools." He also notes that Pompey "had sustained previous to being killed, uniformly, a good character, with the exception of running away once or twice." Rodgers therefore prays that he receive "remuneration for the loss which he has sustained."

PAR Number 11382102

State: South Carolina Year: 1821
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: William Ashley, "a very poor man," discloses that Emanuel, "the only Slave that he possessed," was "found guilty by a magistrate and Jury of our country and was hanged" for making "an assault with an Axe with an intent to kill upon the wife of your petitioner." Noting that said slave was valued at $450, Ashley prays that his case be considered and he be granted "such further relief than the law allows in similar cases."

PAR Number 11382104

State: South Carolina Year: 1821
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Mary Warham represents that, "in consequence of the faithful services and general good conduct" of her slave Simon, she "many years since covenanted and agreed with the said Servant to manumit him upon his paying the sum of Four hundred Dollars." She further acknowledges that "Simon has paid the sum so contracted for before the passing of the Act of 1820, wherefore your Petitioner ought to manumit him." Warham therefore prays that "your Honorable Body would in consideration of the premises manumit ... the said slave Simon." The Act of 1820 "on this subject prevents her" from freeing Simon.

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