Race and Slavery Petitions Project

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PAR Number 11379203

State: South Carolina Year: 1792
Location: Beaufort Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Lightwood seeks compensation for his slave, Bacchus, "who had absonded from his Service" and who "was killed by a Patrole about twelve months ago." Reporting that he is "advised that he is entitled to some compensation for him," the petitioner submits an appraisal for said slave that values Bacchus at sixty pounds sterling at "the time he was killed." The document also claims that Bacchus was killed "for Robbing Benj Davis of his Fire Arm & Arming himself therewith, havg Davis's Gun in his Hand." Bacchus had "been a Runaway for upwards of Eighteen Months."

PAR Number 11379301

State: South Carolina Year: 1793
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Susanna St. John of St. James Parish seeks compensation for the slave Titus. She recounts that her husband, Dr. Stephen St. John, purchased Titus in 1785, “for which he gave his Bond for ₤67 ... with Interest.” Susanna laments, however, that Stephen was "killed by runaway Negroes in April last" and that the said Titus "has since, been convicted of being accessory to his Death, and executed agreeable to Sentence passed the 1st of May." St. John further reveals that Titus was valued at "the Sum of Seventy Pounds" and that a certificate has been delivered to the State Treasurer directing that said sum be paid. The petitioner therefore prays "the valuation of the said Negro may be received by the Treasurer as a payment of the Bond and Interest."

PAR Number 11379306

State: South Carolina Year: 1793
Location: Fairfield Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Joannah Boylstone and her son, George Boylstone, administrators of the estate of William Boylstone, seek compensation for a "Negro Wench" named Rachel worth about seventy-five pounds. Rachel, the petitioners contend, was "forcibly taken & carried off by an armed party of Troops under the command of Genl. Sumter"; William Boylstone "supposed her to have run away or been stolen." In 1790, learning she was held by Major John Davidson in North Carolina, Boylstone brought suit. At the trial in September 1791, the evidence revealed that Rachel had been taken up by troops under the command of Colonel Henry Hampton of Sumter's Brigade and then turned over to Thomas Williams, a soldier in the brigade, as payment for his services (eighty-six pounds sterling) during the war. It was ruled that according to the laws of North and South Carolina owners of slaves taken up as payment to Revolutionary soldiers should apply to their respective legislatures for relief, whereby Boylstone lost his case after considerable expense. The petitioner further lament that, by the time this occurred, the South Carolina Auditor's Office no longer accepted claims for such property. The petitioners, as the widow and orphan of said deceased, confide that they are both "in very indigent circumstances" and that "they are without Remedy except from the Justice of the General Assembly” as they have not recovered "any satisfaction for his said Negro taken and appropriated as aforesaid in payment of one of the just Debts of this State."

PAR Number 11379307

State: South Carolina Year: 1793

Abstract: Godin Guerard seeks compensation for four slaves killed by militia in 1787. He reports that in 1785 he "purchased a considerable number of Negroes then at Saint Augustine" and brought said slaves to South Carolina. He further relates that "four of the above negroes whose proportionable value was at least one hundred guineas each were killed by the militia of this State." Confiding that he and his family are "bordering on Indigence," he states that "no retribution has been as yet made for" the said slaves killed. Guerard therefore prays that his case be considered "with full assurance that the Plea of misfortune and Justice will be heard with Indulgence and granted with Humanity." An attached affidavit verifies the slaves, "the property of Godin Guerard Esquire were killed by the Militia of this State [Georgia] and by the Militia of the State of South Carolina, the said Negro men Slaves being in Rebellion against this State and the State of South Carolina at the time aforesaid."

PAR Number 11379308

State: South Carolina Year: 1793
Location: Fairfield Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Joannah Boylstone and her son, George Boylstone, administrators of the estate of William Boylstone, seek compensation for a "Negro Wench" named Rachel worth about seventy-five pounds. Rachel, the petitioners contend, was "forcibly taken & carried off by an armed party of Troops under the command of Genl. Sumter"; William Boylstone "supposed her to have run away or been stolen." In 1790, learning she was held by Major John Davidson in North Carolina, Boylstone brought suit. At the trial in September 1791, the evidence revealed that Rachel had been taken up by troops under the command of Colonel Henry Hampton of Sumter's Brigade and then turned over to Thomas Williams, a soldier in the brigade, as payment for his services (eighty-six pounds sterling) during the war. It was ruled that according to the laws of North and South Carolina owners of slaves taken up as payment to Revolutionary soldiers should apply to their respective legislatures for relief, whereby Boylstone lost his case after considerable expense. The petitioner further lament that, by the time this occurred, the South Carolina Auditor's Office no longer accepted claims for such property. The petitioners, as the widow and orphan of said deceased, confide that they are both "in very indigent circumstances" and that "they are without Remedy except from the Justice of the General Assembly” as they have not recovered "any satisfaction for his said Negro taken and appropriated as aforesaid in payment of one of the just Debts of this State."

PAR Number 11379310

State: South Carolina Year: 1793
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Susanna St. John of St. James Parish seeks compensation for the slave Titus. She recounts that her husband, Dr. Stephen St. John, purchased Titus in 1785, “for which he gave his Bond for ₤67 ... with Interest.” Susanna laments, however, that Stephen was "killed by runaway Negroes in April last" and that the said Titus "has since, been convicted of being accessory to his Death, and executed agreeable to Sentence passed the 1st of May." St. John further reveals that Titus was valued at "the Sum of Seventy Pounds" and that a certificate has been delivered to the State Treasurer directing that said sum be paid. The petitioner therefore prays "the valuation of the said Negro may be received by the Treasurer as a payment of the Bond and Interest."

PAR Number 11379503

State: South Carolina Year: 1795

Abstract: John Green laments that "the only Slave he could Place any Confidence in" was "apprehended for an offence, and was brought to trial, and condemned to be hanged." Green, as "the manager of his Plantation," reveals that this "Event has been greatly to your Petitioners disadvantage." Noting that the slave was valued at seventy pounds sterling, the petitioner "humbly conceives your Honorable Body possesses too much Justice to Reject his Petition."

PAR Number 11379508

State: South Carolina Year: 1795

Abstract: John Adams recounts that in 1792 he "had the misfortune of having a valuable Negroe man (which was appraised at Eighty pounds ...) shot by a Party of Militia in pursuit of some runaways." He reports that he sent "the papers respecting the Same to the Legislature" but that his request was "rejected, as his demand came not under the Sanction of the Law." Adams requests "that your honorable house will reconsider his Case."

PAR Number 11379509

State: South Carolina Year: 1795

Abstract: John Adams recounts that in 1792 he "had the misfortune of having a valuable Negroe man (who was appraised at Eighty pounds ...) shot by a party of militia in pursuit of some runaways." He reports that he sent "the papers respecting the same to the Legislature" but that “his prayer was rejected on the belief that his demand came not under the sanction of the Law." Adams requests "that your honorable house will reconsider” his case.

PAR Number 11379702

State: South Carolina Year: 1797
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Susanna St. John of St. James Parish seeks compensation for the slave Titus. She recounts that her husband, Dr. Stephen St. John, purchased Titus in 1785 and “gave his Bond for ₤67.” Susanna further states that "the said Negro Titus was found Guilty of being accessory (or principal) to the Death of your Petitioners Husband, and was Executed accordingly." Revealing that Titus was valued at £70 Sterling, the petitioner "(as the Estate of the Deceased is insolvent) prays a remission of the Debt."

PAR Number 11379703

State: South Carolina Year: 1797
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Nine "Inhabitants of St. James Parish Goose Creek" submit that, on the night of 6 March 1797, "a Certain Negro man slave Named Beny" set fire to the house and barn of George Keckely; the said slave was "the Property of Conrad Keckely, the Father of the said George." They further declare that, on 6 April 1797, the "Offender was duly Convicted and Hung But not before being valued and Appraised at one Hundred Pounds." The petitioners, "Neighbours of the Said George Keckely," state that they "are moved with Humanity and Pity" for the said George Keckely. They therefore pray that the said George be paid "the full amt of One Hundred pounds being the appraisement and value thereof [which] will encourage the Bringing Such wanton Criminallity to Examplary punishment."

PAR Number 11379708

State: South Carolina Year: 1797
Location: Abbeville Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Georgia residents James Hughlin and Elijah Clark seek compensation for their slaves, who were executed in Abbeville District, South Carolina, for burglary. The petitioners report that "said Negroes were appraised by the Justices and Jury who tried them, as follows: Negro Jim, the property of James Hughlin, at Three Hundred Dollars; and Negro Summer, the property of Elijah Clark, at One Hundred & fifty Dollars." Noting that they have "never received any compensation," they pray that their petition will be taken "into consideration" and that they will be granted relief.

PAR Number 11379709

State: South Carolina Year: 1797
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Nine "Inhabitants of St. James Parish Goose Creek" submit that, on the night of 6 March 1797, "a Certain Negro man Slave Named Beny" set fire to the house and barn of George Keckely; the said slave was "the property of Conrad Keckely, the Father of the Said George." They further declare that, on 6 April 1797, the "offender was duly Convicted, and Hung but not before being valued and Appraised at one Hundred pounds." The petitioners, "Neighbours of the Said George Keckely," state that they "are moved with Humanity and Pity" for the said George Keckely. They therefore pray that the said George be paid "the full Sum of one Hundred pounds being the appraisement and value thereof which will encurage the Bringing Such wanton Criminallity to Exemplary punishment."

PAR Number 11379802

State: South Carolina Year: 1798
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: James Delaire states that his slave, Paul, alias Figaro, was convicted of sedition and sentenced to be transported from the United States to the Dutch Colony of Surinam and sold. Other slaves involved in the plot were hanged, but Paul testified against them and his life was spared. Paul was turned over to Duncan Hill, owner of the brig Aurora, for transport to Surinam. Owing to the "Intense cold the said Figaro had suffered in the Work House at Charleston & the strong pressure of the Irons on his legs very few days after the Sailing of the Aurora he was taken with a swelling about the ankles which turn'd into a sore & that a mortification of the flesh ensuing his toes rotted & one of his feet drop'd of[f] entirely." As a result, Paul sold for only about $20 though he was worth $350. Delaire seeks compensation.

PAR Number 11379803

State: South Carolina Year: 1798
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: James Delaire states that his slave, Paul, alias Figaro, was convicted of sedition and sentenced to be transported from the United States to the Dutch Colony of Surinam and sold. Other slaves involved in the plot were hanged, but Paul testified against them and his life was spared. Paul was turned over to Duncan Hill, owner of the brig Aurora, for transport to Surinam. Owing to the "Intense cold the said Figaro had suffered in the Work House at Charleston & the strong pressure of the Irons on his legs very few days after the Sailing of the Aurora he was taken with a swelling about the ankles which turn'd into a sore & that a mortification of the flesh ensuing his toes rotted & one of his feet drop'd of[f] entirely." As a result, Paul sold for only about $20 though he was worth $350. Delaire seeks compensation.

PAR Number 11379805

State: South Carolina Year: 1798

Abstract: George Keckeley seeks compensation for the slave Ben, who "in the dead of Night Sett fire to his Dwelling house and Barn." He further asserts that, "from motives of making a public Example of so great a Crime," he delivered Ben to the authorities, whereupon Ben "was brought to his tryal, found Guilty, Convicted and Hung, but not untill he was valued, and agreed upon to be worth one hundred Pounds." The petitioner, in view of his "great loss of his Dwelling & other property," prays that the Treasurer pay to him "the full amount of the sd. appraisement."

PAR Number 11379806

State: South Carolina Year: 1798

Abstract: George Keckeley seeks compensation for the slave Ben, who "in the dead of Night Sett fire to his Dwelling house and Barn." He further asserts that, "from motives of making a public Example of so great a Crime," he delivered Ben to the authorities, whereupon Ben "was brought to his tryal, found Guilty, Convicted and Hung, but not untill he was valued, and agreed upon to be worth one hundred Pounds." The petitioner, in view of his "great loss of his Dwelling & other property," prays that the Treasurer pay to him "the full amount of the sd. appraisement."

PAR Number 11379906

State: South Carolina Year: 1799
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Joshua Canter represents that he purchased a slave named Cain from Thomas Coveney "some short time ago" for seventy-six pounds. He further discloses that "a court of Justices and freeholders passed Sentence of death upon the Said Negroe for committing burglary and larceny which Sentence was accordingly executed on the fifteenth day of November instant." Canter reports that "before passing the Said Sentence" Cain was appraised and valued at seventy pounds. The petitioner therefore prays that his circumstances be considered and that the treasurer of the state be directed "to pay unto him the value of the Said Slave."

PAR Number 11380004

State: South Carolina Year: 1800
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Dr. Samuel Fairchild seeks compensation for two slaves, Solomon and Dorcas. He reports that Solomon was "convicted and executed for the atrocious crime of murder, which he wantonly and maliciously committed upon the body of his Wife Dorcas, a wench also belonging to your petitioner." Fairchild states that Solomon was appraised "by a Court of Justices and Freeholders on Edisto Island, Charleston District" before his execution at the value of £65 sterling; Dorcas was valued by "three honest and worthy Citizens" at £120 sterling. The petitioner, having not "received any part of the said appraisement," humbly "submits to your honourable Body his great loss, and prays that you will grant him such compensation as you may in your wisdom and justice deem proper."

PAR Number 11380009

State: South Carolina Year: 1800
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Dr. Samuel Fairchild seeks compensation for two slaves, Solomon and Dorcas. He reports that Solomon was "convicted and executed for the atrocious crime of murder, which he wantonly and maliciously committed upon the body of his Wife Dorcas, a wench also belonging to your petitioner." Fairchild states that Solomon was appraised "by a Court of Justices and Freeholders on Edisto Island, Charleston District" before his execution at the value of £65 sterling; Dorcas was valued by "three honest and worthy Citizens" at £120 sterling. The petitioner, having not "received any part of the said appraisement," humbly "submits to your honourable Body his great loss, and prays that you will grant him such compensation as you may in your wisdom and justice deem proper."

PAR Number 11380013

State: South Carolina Year: 1800

Abstract: William Somarsall seeks compensation for his slave, September, who was "condemned and executed for Murder." He avers that September was "valued & appraised at one Hundred Pounds Sterling" by the Court of Justices and Freeholders. The petitioner therefore "submits his Case & relies on the Justice of the legislature to afford him such relief" as his circumstance may require.

PAR Number 11380020

State: South Carolina Year: 1800
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Mary Norton seeks compensation for her slave, Cuffy, who was "condemned to be executed for Larceny & attempting to cut the throat of Solomon Nathan." Norton, "a widow in indigent circumstances," claims that Cuffy "was in a considerable degree the source whence she drew her support." Noting that said slave was appraised at eighty pounds sterling," the petitioner prays the "Honble house to order the said sum of eighty pounds Sterling to be paid her or to afford her such relief as to your wisdom shall seem proper."

PAR Number 11380109

State: South Carolina Year: 1801
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Amos Pilsbury, administrator of the estate of Edward Tash, seeks compensation for the slave Mary, who was convicted of arson by the Wardens of the City Council of Charleston in July 1798 and "executed shortly afterward." Mary, a slave belonging to said Tash, was worth three hundred dollars at the time of her death. Pilsbury represents that "neither the said Edward Tash in his life time, or your petitioner since the death of the said Edward Tash have received any payment, satisfaction or recompense for the said Negro Woman Mary."

PAR Number 11380202

State: South Carolina Year: 1802
Location: Abbeville Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Samuel Harris seeks compensation for his twenty-year-old slave Harry, who was killed 26 March 1802 by "the fall of a tree" while working on the public road from Vienna to Abbeville Courthouse. Harris "entreats your honorable body to take into consideration his unfortunate case and begs that you would allow compensation for the property aforesaid which he has lost in the public service." Harry, "a good field hand and a tolerable good blacksmith," was valued at $600. Several citizens attest that Harry’s accidental death “was not owing to any misconduct on the part of the said Negro or any other person."

PAR Number 11380203

State: South Carolina Year: 1802
Location: Abbeville Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Samuel Harris seeks compensation for his twenty-year-old slave Harry, who was killed 26 March 1802 by "the fall of a tree" while working on the public road from Vienna to Abbeville Courthouse. Harris "entreats your honorable body to take into consideration his unfortunate case and begs that you would allow compensation for the property aforesaid which he has lost in the public service." Harry, "a good field hand and a tolerable good blacksmith," was valued at $600. Several citizens attest that Harry’s accidental death “was not owing to any misconduct on the part of the said Negro or any other person."

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