Race and Slavery Petitions Project

Search Results

Your subject search returned 2632 total results.

Displaying 25 results per page.

PAR Number 11081502

State: Mississippi Year: 1815
Location: Franklin Location Type: County

Abstract: In June 1812, Solomon Whitley traded with Isaac Waters for a female house servant named Hannah. A few months later, Whitley accused Waters of stealing Hannah, and Waters was jailed in Franklin County. Because of an "insufficient" jail, the accused was transferred to Jefferson County, where he posted a $500 bond using two slaves as security. This, according to Whitley, gave him a chance "to make his escape with your petitioners Negro," while the two slaves were turned over to the territorial government. Whitley complained that he was the only one hurt by the theft and that his wife was weak and unable to do "domestic labor which she has been oblidge to do since Walters have deprived her of her help." He asks for relief.

PAR Number 11082301

State: Mississippi Year: 1823
Location: Adams Location Type: County

Abstract: A group of twenty-nine citizens ask the legislature to approve the emancipation of Limerick, a fifty-year-old slave who paid his master $600 for his freedom. Limerick, the petitioners write, "has ever been a faithful and trusty Slave," and they believe "no injury will arise to the community by means of his legal Emancipation." Among the petitioners is Limerick's owner, Ezekiel Newman.

PAR Number 11083004

State: Mississippi Year: 1830
Location: Hinds Location Type: County

Abstract: Elizabeth Fort seeks remuneration from the state after her slave Henry was executed for stabbing a white man with intent to kill. She is fifty-two years old and owns only two other slaves, a man and a woman, "capable of serving her, & providing a support for her declining years."

PAR Number 11083202

State: Mississippi Year: 1832
Location: Warren Location Type: County

Abstract: The administratrix and heirs of the late Eve Hyland seek to emancipate Joe, a slave in Hyland's estate. They inform the court that the late Hyland stipulated in her will that if Joe paid her heirs his appraised value, he should be freed. Joe was appraised at $500, a sum which he has now paid the heirs. The petitioners state that Joe is well-behaved, industrious, honest, and would not "become a state charge," and that he should now be emancipated.

PAR Number 11085901

State: Mississippi Year: 1859

Abstract: In the summer of 1858, a slave named Peter, owned by Dr. E. A. Miller of Wayne County, was employed on the railroad near the town of Enterprise. The petitioners claim that Peter "caught and by force violated the person of a beautiful young Lady by Committing a Rape." Captured the same day, he was jailed and tried within twenty-four hours. In the presence of the young woman and her parents, Peter was tried and found guilty by a jury sitting in magistrate court. That night he was taken from jail by a mob and hanged. A committee of five townspeople seeks compensation for Miller for the loss of his property.

PAR Number 11086011

State: Mississippi Year: 1860
Location: Kemper Location Type: County

Abstract: Thirty citizens of Kemper County write on behalf of free man of color Will Reed, "a faithful and quiet negro" who has always been trustworthy and honest. They explain that his former "mistress" had wished to set him free, but was prevented to do so by the will of her late husband. Consequently, Will was sold at auction four years ago, but since then he has bought himself for the sum of $935. The petitioners ask that he be exempt from an act of the legislature that would force him to leave the state or be sold into slavery. They say that the act has been "lately passed and approved."

PAR Number 11086012

State: Mississippi Year: 1860
Location: Kemper Location Type: County

Abstract: Citizens of Kemper County write on behalf of free man of color Will Reed, "a faithful and quiet negro" who has always been trustworthy and honest. They explain that his former "mistress" had wished to set him free, but was prevented to do so by the will of her late husband. Consequently, Will was sold at auction four years ago, but since then he has bought himself for the sum of $935. The petitioners ask that he be exempt from an act of the legislature that would force him to leave the state or be sold into slavery. They say that the act has been "lately passed and approved."

PAR Number 11086301

State: Mississippi Year: 1863
Location: Clarke Location Type: County

Abstract: Reese Price requests compensation for his slave Anthony, who died from exposure after being impressed to work on fortifications near Columbus, Mississippi. Anthony was a "mechanic", that is a carpenter, and one of only three male and two female adults Price had to work on his farm. Although he owned twenty slaves, he notes that the others are children less than thirteen years of age.

PAR Number 11086502

State: Mississippi Year: 1865
Location: Madison Location Type: County

Abstract: W. S. G. Walker requests compensation in the amount of three thousand dollars for his slave named Caroline, who died in jail awaiting trial on charges of burning his house. Due to the war, the Circuit Court was never held, either in November 1861 or April 1862, and, after fifteen months in jail, the slave died.

PAR Number 11278803

State: North Carolina Year: 1788
Location: Brunswick Location Type: County

Abstract: Thomas Lucas represents that his slave named Peter, "not liking the man your Petitioner placed him to work with, ran away." He further states that Peter was later apprehended for "having robbed an Hen house" and was "precipitately tried & executed, more your Petitioner believes from a supposed necessity of striking terror into a Gang of Runaways who infested the said Town & neighbourhood than from any particular act of villainy in the said Slave." Lucas "hopes that considering his misfortunes & low Estate ... will induce your Honors to indemnify him for the Execution of the said Negro which otherwise will increase his losses & at his private Expence have been made a Sacrifice to publick Policy."

PAR Number 11278902

State: North Carolina Year: 1789
Location: New Hanover Location Type: County

Abstract: John Walker seeks compensation for his slave Galloway, who was "a Valluable Tradesman" killed in 1780 as an outlawed runaway, "lurking in Swamps, Woods, and other obscure Places, committing Injuries to the Inhabitants of this State."

PAR Number 11278904

State: North Carolina Year: 1788
Location: Brunswick Location Type: County

Abstract: "Old and well advanced in years," Sarah Dupre asks to be compensated for the loss of her slave, who had been "tried, Condemned, and Executed agreeable to Law" in March 1778 and "Was appraised by the Court who sat on his tryal to the sum of Eighty pounds." Dupre laments that she is "infirm in her Constitution, and thro' misfortunes is left with but barely sufficient to keep her above want." She therefore "earnestly intreats" the legislature "to direct that the said sum of Eighty Pounds aforesaid to [which] she conceives herself intitled be paid."

PAR Number 11279808

State: North Carolina Year: 1798
Location: Wake Location Type: County

Abstract: Peter Bird, by his fortunate "passing the State House in Raleigh," was able to foil the designs of "divers men" who were engaged in robbing "the Treasury Office as well as all the other offices in the State House." Bird, "a negroe man Slave the property of John Haywood," believes he "only acted the part of an honest man in making the discovery." He further notes that "the General Assembly would have rewarded a white man for such an essential service by a large sum in Cash." Hoping "to be set free from his master as a reward he has rendered the state," the petitioner avows that "to a man in Slavery, no reward can be so valuable as ... being emancipated."

PAR Number 11281004

State: North Carolina Year: 1810
Location: Greene Location Type: County

Abstract: Bryan Lane charges that constable Nathan Holmes colluded with Benjamin Saules in the illegal purchase of two female slaves, seized "by virtue of an Execution which was in fact obtained ... to the amount of about Twenty Dollars against your memorialist." He further declares that "he had part of the money & beged [Holmes] to stay the Sale till your memorialist could to a neighbours house within a half mile where he had full assurance of geting the balance." Lane asserts, however, that Holmes, who "had an Interest in the Sale," refused and the slaves Comfort and Selah, "worth at least Five hundred Dollars," were knocked off “to a Certain Benjamin Saules ... at the reduced price of about Forty Shillings each." The petitioner therefore prays that a law be passed “fully & absolutely confirming the title of said negroes in him, or at least making void the said Sale.”

PAR Number 11282709

State: North Carolina Year: 1827
Location: Northampton Location Type: County

Abstract: Ransom Cassel, currently "in very indigent circumstances," seeks compensation for a runaway slave named Austin, who was killed in an attempt to apprehend said slave in 1813 or 1814. Cassel avers that he would have petitioned the legislature sooner had he known that a section of the 1741 law dealing with such cases had been repealed prior to Austin's death. The petitioner therefore prays "your Honorable body to make him a suitable allowance for the said slave according to the valuation affixed by the County Court."

PAR Number 11283302

State: North Carolina Year: 1833
Location: Cumberland Location Type: County

Abstract: Joseph Hostler, a barber in Fayetteville belonging to the estate of David Smith, reports that Smith allowed him "to purchase his own freedom" and that he has "paid to the said Smith & his Executrix ... the full sum of Five hundred Dollars, the sum required of him"; he also states that he has paid $96 "per year for about Four years and a half." The petitioner therefore "prays that he may be emancipated and admitted to the privileges of free men of Colour in this state."

PAR Number 11284401

State: North Carolina Year: 1844

Abstract: Jacob, Mary, Patsey, Meriwether, and Matilda, free blacks in Halifax County, Virginia, ask to settle in North Carolina. They explain that they were freed by the will of their late master, Phillip E. Vass [the younger]; said will directed that $2,000 be used to purchase at least 250 acres of land in North Carolina where the manumitted slaves would settle. The petitioners avow that "they are very poor and entirely destitute of the means to remove to any of the United States or to any other Country in which the laws would suffer them to reside and unless they can have the benefit of the provision made for them in the will aforesaid they are at all times liable by the laws of Virginia to be sold as slaves." They "therefore cast themselves on the indulgence of your Honourable body and humbly entreat that the benevolent intentions of their former master towards them may be suffered to be carried into execution by removing the restrictions which now prevent their availing themselves of all the benefits of the provision made for them by his will."

PAR Number 11285801

State: North Carolina Year: 1858
Location: Granville Location Type: County

Abstract: William Gilliam represents that he hired his slave named Jacob "to the President of the Raleigh & Gaston Rail Road then the property of the State & under its control, to work on the Shop in the City of Raleigh which had been partly destroyed by fire." Gilliam charges that, while on board the train and en route to Raleigh, his slave "was put by the President of the Road ... to the business of putting wood on ... at the various stations"; when the train lurched, Jacob "was thrown on the track, and the wheels of one of Cars ran over his ankle & foot mashing them very badly." Gilliam reports that Jacob "never recovered" and that "he was rendered for a long time useless to your memorialist, and his death was caused ultimately by said injury." The petitioner therefore prays that he be compensated for the loss of Jacob, since “the death of the said slave was a heavy loss to your memorialist--He was an excellent carpenter- & was worth at least $2,000."

PAR Number 11285806

State: North Carolina Year: 1858
Location: Granville Location Type: County

Abstract: William Gilliam represents that he hired his slave named Jacob "to the President of the Raleigh & Gaston Rail Road then the property of the State & under its control, to work on the Shop in the City of Raleigh which had been partly destroyed by fire." Gilliam charges that, while on board the train and en route to Raleigh, his slave "was put by the President of the Road ... to the business of putting wood on ... at the various stations"; when the train lurched, Jacob "was thrown on the track, and the wheels of one of Cars ran over his ankle & foot mashing them very badly." Gilliam reports that Jacob "never recovered" and that "he was rendered for a long time useless to your memorialist, and his death was caused ultimately by said injury." The petitioner therefore prays that he be compensated for the loss of Jacob, since “the death of the said slave was a heavy loss to your memorialist--He was an excellent carpenter- & was worth at least $2,000."

PAR Number 11378308

State: South Carolina Year: 1783

Abstract: Joshua Lockwood represents that he delivered "a Cargo of Goods to the amount of about Six Thousand Pounds Sterling; which got up Safe to Pon Pon without fee or reward" during the American Revolution in 1782. During his return trip "one of his negroes fell overboard and was unfortunately drown'd, which Slave cannot be replaced for a Hundred Pounds Sterling; which loss your petitioner prays the Honorable House may take into consideration, and allow him what they think mete for his loss."

PAR Number 11378501

State: South Carolina Year: 1785

Abstract: Joshua Lockwood represents that "in 1782 when Powder Ball and Medicine cou’d not be procur'd from other Quarters he did supply your Army from the British Garrison at the risque of life and fortune." Lockwood notes that he also sent his son and "five hands" to deliver "Goods for the Army to the amount of upwards of six Thousand pounds Sterling" and that during that expedition "a negroe fellow of your Petitioners fell overbor'd and was drowned, which slave your Petitioner cannot replace for one Hundred Guineas." Lockwood therefore prays "this Honorable House to take his loss into consideration and grant him such relief as they think meet."

PAR Number 11378503

State: South Carolina Year: 1785
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Joseph Warnock seeks compensation for two slaves who were tried, convicted and executed for having poisoned his family. Warnock relates that, "after the Establishment of Peace," he "had hope to have rested from the toil of war, by returning from camp to his family & to have shared in domestic happiness with a wife & Six Children." He laments, however, "that in the midst of these pleasing prospects your petitioner & his whole family were most wantonly & Cruelly poisoned" by two of his slaves, whereby two of his children died. Warnock, "highly distressed," prays "Such relief as in your wisdom your honorable house shall think meet."

PAR Number 11378703

State: South Carolina Year: 1787

Abstract: John Dorsius and William Bellamy seek compensation for their slave, Anthony, who was convicted and executed for highway robbery in February 1784. The Court of Justices and Freeholders appraised Anthony's value at fifty pounds sterling.

PAR Number 11379103

State: South Carolina Year: 1791

Abstract: John Jordan states that "in November 1778 the only slave that your Petitioner possessed was executed pursuant to a Sentence of Two Magistrates and five Freeholders for Poisoning." He further asserts that "said Slave was valued according to Law at ₤1200 -- Old Currency for which he received a Certificate." Jordan claims that he presented said certificate for payment when "the Town was invested by the British Army under General Clinton which induces your Petitioner to believe was the reason that his demand was not paid." Jacob therefore prays that "the Commissioners of the Treasury may be directed to Pay" him for his loss.

PAR Number 11379110

State: South Carolina Year: 1791
Location: Chester Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Hugh Knox represents that in 1781 "a party of General Sumter's Brigade of Militia then acting under General Sumters Orders, surprized and Captured several British Officers" and "in the possession of said Officers was a Negroe Boy which the Captors considered as a Lawfull Capture, and as such was Disposed of at publick Sale" and that "your Petitioner purchased said Negroe under the strongest belief that the sale was legal." The petitioner reveals, however, that he was sued "for detaining said Negroe, in which a Judgement hath been given against him for damages and cost of Suit." Knox complains that, by the Judges' construction of said law, the officers "are Justifiable in makeing such Sales, but that the purchasers are not Justifiable in holding the property so sold, By which construction of the Law your petitioner hath suffered great loss and damage." Knox therefore prays for relief for himself and others in "like circumstances likely to share the same fate."

Next 25 Results