Race and Slavery Petitions Project

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PAR Number 10382008

State: Delaware Year: 1820
Location: Kent Location Type: County

Abstract: Sixty-one Delaware residents view the proposed expansion of slavery into Missouri and the territory of Arkansas "with anxious foreboding." The petitioners thus urge the legislature to instruct the state's senators and representatives "to give their voice and influence to restrict slavery in the territory of Arkansaw, and proposed new State of Missouri." The petitioners cite the federal law of 1787 prohibiting slavery from "all territory then appertaining to the United States" and the Delaware declaration of rights of 1776. Furthermore, they argue, the Constitution authorizes the Congress to administer the territories and to review applications for statehood and approve or reject them as it may deem "most conducive to the interests of the Union." Finally, the Constitution outlawed the importation of slaves after 1808. Thus, they argue, the Constitution permits Congress, which has proved itself willing, to regulate slavery in the territories.

PAR Number 10382211

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Six citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382212

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Twenty-eight citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382213

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Twelve citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382214

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Forty-nine citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382215

State: Delaware Year: 1821

Abstract: Forty citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382216

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Forty citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382217

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Eleven citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382218

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Fourteen citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382219

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Four citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382220

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Twenty-six citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382221

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Fifteen citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382222

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Twelve citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382223

State: Delaware Year: 1822

Abstract: Thirty-two citizens of Delaware seek the gradual abolition of slavery in the state. They cite moral, political, social, and economic reasons. In the past thirty years, the petitioners state, the slave population in the state has declined from one-seventh to less than one-thirtieth of the population. Hence, "were we to descend even to the sordid calculation of loss and gain, the sacrifice required by a gradual abolition, would be as nothing." They "respectfully solicit" the legislature, "as the guardians of the publick welfare, to designate a day, after which all coloured children born in our State shall be free."

PAR Number 10382406

State: Delaware Year: 1824

Abstract: Twenty-nine petitioners "conceive it to be our duty to call the attention of our Representatives once more to the situation of the People of Colour among us." They argue that the "recent calamities in the West-Indies" and "the alarms which have disquieted the minds of our brethren in the Southern States and rendered property less secure, are motives we believe sufficiently strong to induce such steps as may lead to a gradual Abolition of Slavery." They further "desire that a review of those Laws may take place, as from recent and melancholy experience we are constrained to declare, that they have not been found sufficient to prevent unprincipled men from the practice of a traffic disgraceful to a land where liberty which should be a common blessing is denied to only one class of unhappy and degraded men."

PAR Number 10382420

State: Delaware Year: 1824

Abstract: Fifty-one petitioners "conceive it to be our duty to call the attention of our Representatives once more to the situation of the People of Colour among us." They argue that the "recent calamities in the West-Indies" and "the alarms which have disquieted the minds of our brethren in the Southern States and rendered property less secure, are motives we believe sufficiently strong to induce such steps as may lead to a gradual Abolition of Slavery." They further "desire that a review of those Laws may take place, as from recent and melancholy experience we are constrained to declare, that they have not been found sufficient to prevent unprincipled men from the practice of a traffic disgraceful to a land where liberty which should be a common blessing is denied to only one class of unhappy and degraded men."

PAR Number 10382422

State: Delaware Year: 1824

Abstract: Eleven petitioners "conceive it to be our duty to call the attention of our Representatives once more to the situation of the People of Colour among us." They argue that the "recent calamities in the West-Indies" and "the alarms which have disquieted the minds of our brethren in the Southern States and rendered property less secure, are motives we believe sufficiently strong to induce such steps as may lead to a gradual Abolition of Slavery." They further "desire that a review of those Laws may take place, as from recent and melancholy experience we are constrained to declare, that they have not been found sufficient to prevent unprincipled men from the practice of a traffic disgraceful to a land where liberty which should be a common blessing is denied to only one class of unhappy and degraded men."

PAR Number 10382423

State: Delaware Year: 1824

Abstract: Eight petitioners "conceive it to be our duty to call the attention of our Representatives once more to the situation of the People of Colour among us." They argue that the "recent calamities in the West-Indies" and "the alarms which have disquieted the minds of our brethren in the Southern States and rendered property less secure, are motives we believe sufficiently strong to induce such steps as may lead to a gradual Abolition of Slavery." They further "desire that a review of those Laws may take place, as from recent and melancholy experience we are constrained to declare, that they have not been found sufficient to prevent unprincipled men from the practice of a traffic disgraceful to a land where liberty which should be a common blessing is denied to only one class of unhappy and degraded men."

PAR Number 10382601

State: Delaware Year: 1826

Abstract: Twenty-three Delaware citizens urge the legislature to enact a law providing for the gradual abolition of slavery in Delaware. The petitioners suggest that "the issue of all slaves born in this State after the Fourth day of July 1826, shall be free on attaining the age of twenty-one years, or such other period as shall be deemed more expedient and proper." They believe that "a law to this effect, it will not be doubted by any intelligent person, may be passed without any violation of the national compact or of our own constitution, or infringement of the rights of individuals, and without any danger to our interest, peace and harmony. What excuse then can be found for delaying to place Delaware in the list of free States?" Of the conviction that "a wrong has been inflicted upon Africa, for which it is our duty as Christians and Patriots to make every reparation in our power," the memorialists declare that adopting such measures "will afford you a subject of pleasing and consoling reflections, and give joy and gladness to the hearts of thousands."

PAR Number 10382602

State: Delaware Year: 1826
Location: New Castle Location Type: County

Abstract: The Wilmington Society of Friends, at their monthly meeting, urge the legislature to immediately abolish slavery. Arguing that slavery is evil, unjust, and oppressive, the petitioners put forth that "we believe it to be a truth, that in oppression, cruel suffering, and degradation, negro Slavery remains without a parallel in the known world."

PAR Number 10382603

State: Delaware Year: 1826

Abstract: Forty-nine Delaware citizens urge the legislature to enact a law providing for the gradual abolition of slavery in Delaware. The petitioners suggest that "the issue of all slaves born in this State after the Fourth day of July 1826, shall be free on attaining the age of twenty-one years, or such other period as shall be deemed more expedient and proper." They believe that "a law to this effect, it will not be doubted by any intelligent person, may be passed without any violation of the national compact or of our own constitution, or infringement of the rights of individuals, and without any danger to our interest, peace and harmony. What excuse then can be found for delaying to place Delaware in the list of free States?" Of the conviction that "a wrong has been inflicted upon Africa, for which it is our duty as Christians and Patriots to make every reparation in our power," the memorialists declare that adopting such measures "will afford you a subject of pleasing and consoling reflections, and give joy and gladness to the hearts of thousands."

PAR Number 10382604

State: Delaware Year: 1826

Abstract: Thirty-one Delaware citizens urge the legislature to enact a law providing for the gradual abolition of slavery in Delaware. The petitioners suggest that "the issue of all slaves born in this State after the Fourth day of July 1826, shall be free on attaining the age of twenty-one years, or such other period as shall be deemed more expedient and proper." They believe that "a law to this effect, it will not be doubted by any intelligent person, may be passed without any violation of the national compact or of our own constitution, or infringement of the rights of individuals, and without any danger to our interest, peace and harmony. What excuse then can be found for delaying to place Delaware in the list of free States?" Of the conviction that "a wrong has been inflicted upon Africa, for which it is our duty as Christians and Patriots to make every reparation in our power," the memorialists declare that adopting such measures "will afford you a subject of pleasing and consoling reflections, and give joy and gladness to the hearts of thousands."

PAR Number 10382605

State: Delaware Year: 1826

Abstract: Nineteen Delaware citizens urge the legislature to enact a law providing for the gradual abolition of slavery in Delaware. The petitioners suggest that "the issue of all slaves born in this State after the Fourth day of July 1826, shall be free on attaining the age of twenty-one years, or such other period as shall be deemed more expedient and proper." They believe that "a law to this effect, it will not be doubted by any intelligent person, may be passed without any violation of the national compact or of our own constitution, or infringement of the rights of individuals, and without any danger to our interest, peace and harmony. What excuse then can be found for delaying to place Delaware in the list of free States?" Of the conviction that "a wrong has been inflicted upon Africa, for which it is our duty as Christians and Patriots to make every reparation in our power," the memorialists declare that adopting such measures "will afford you a subject of pleasing and consoling reflections, and give joy and gladness to the hearts of thousands."

PAR Number 10382606

State: Delaware Year: 1826

Abstract: Twenty-nine Delaware citizens urge the legislature to enact a law providing for the gradual abolition of slavery in Delaware. The petitioners suggest that "the issue of all slaves born in this State after the Fourth day of July 1826, shall be free on attaining the age of twenty-one years, or such other period as shall be deemed more expedient and proper." They believe that "a law to this effect, it will not be doubted by any intelligent person, may be passed without any violation of the national compact or of our own constitution, or infringement of the rights of individuals, and without any danger to our interest, peace and harmony. What excuse then can be found for delaying to place Delaware in the list of free States?" Of the conviction that "a wrong has been inflicted upon Africa, for which it is our duty as Christians and Patriots to make every reparation in our power," the memorialists declare that adopting such measures "will afford you a subject of pleasing and consoling reflections, and give joy and gladness to the hearts of thousands."

PAR Number 10382607

State: Delaware Year: 1826

Abstract: Fifty-three Delaware citizens urge the legislature to enact a law providing for the gradual abolition of slavery in Delaware. The petitioners suggest that "the issue of all slaves born in this State after the Fourth day of July 1826, shall be free on attaining the age of twenty-one years, or such other period as shall be deemed more expedient and proper." They believe that "a law to this effect, it will not be doubted by any intelligent person, may be passed without any violation of the national compact or of our own constitution, or infringement of the rights of individuals, and without any danger to our interest, peace and harmony. What excuse then can be found for delaying to place Delaware in the list of free States?" Of the conviction that "a wrong has been inflicted upon Africa, for which it is our duty as Christians and Patriots to make every reparation in our power," the memorialists declare that adopting such measures "will afford you a subject of pleasing and consoling reflections, and give joy and gladness to the hearts of thousands."

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