Race and Slavery Petitions Project

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Your subject search returned 137 total results.

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PAR Number 11381408

State: South Carolina Year: 1814
Location: Fairfield Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Cook of Georgia states that his wife, Mary Ellen Hampton Cook, "became entitled to a certain negroe man, by name Ellis" as a legatee in the will of her maternal grandfather, George Dawkins. Cook reveals that his father-in-law, Colonel Edward Hampton, was killed during the American Revolution and that the said Ellis was accidentally shot and killed by militia in pursuit "of certain persons known to be inimical to the cause of this country." Noting that his wife has never received any kind of remuneration "for this accidental misfortune," the petitioner prays "for some indemnification in right of his wife."

PAR Number 11381804

State: South Carolina Year: 1818
Location: Marion Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: William Baker, a man "whose means are at best very limited," seeks compensation for his slave who was killed by "the accidental falling of a peice of timber while raising the Roof" on the Marion District jail. Baker believes "that it is always the intention of your honorable body that persons whose hands are employed on any publick work belonging to the State shall receive a fair profit on their labor instead of the loss of them." The petitioner therefore prays that his case be "attentively and feelingly considered" and that "some remuneration be made for the loss of said negro."

PAR Number 11381910

State: South Carolina Year: 1819

Abstract: William Washington states that "in the month of June last he sent a number of slaves to be employed under the directions of the Civil & military Engineer in the service of the State." He reports that the next month one of said slaves "was killed by a stone which was projected to a distance much greater than usual." Trusting in the "Justice & Wisdom of your Honorable House," the petitioner prays that he "be compensated for the loss he has sustained."

PAR Number 11382003

State: South Carolina Year: 1820
Location: Williamsburgh Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Matthews, executor of the estate of Isaac Matthews, states that "a negro man named Sam the property of Isaac Matthews aforesaid was drowned when in Public Service working on Black River." He further reports that "the said Isaac Matthews in his life time or his estate since his death has not been remunerated for said loss, notwithstanding applications have been made." He "humbly hopes that your Honorable Body will take the Case under your serious Consideration, and grant such Relief in the premises as you, in your wisdom may deem meet."

PAR Number 11382004

State: South Carolina Year: 1820
Location: Williamsburgh Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Matthews, executor of the estate of Isaac Matthews, states that "a Negro man named Sam the property [the deceased] was drowned when in public service working on Black River." He further reports that "the said Isaac Matthews in his life time or his estate since his death has not been remunerated for said loss, notwithstanding applications have been made." He "humbly hopes that your Honorable body will take the Case under your serious consideration, and grant such relief in the premises as you in your Wisdom may deem meet."

PAR Number 11382213

State: South Carolina Year: 1822
Location: Beaufort Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Dr. Francis Porcher seeks compensation for the "surgical operation" he conducted on the body of a dead slave. Porcher recalls that the jury of inquest and the acting coroner required his expertise as they "were unable to form any verdict as the cause of said negro's death without a surgical operation." The petitioner admits that he "is at a loss what charge to make for such an operation, but leaves it to the discretion & liberality of your honorable body to prescribe what compensation he shall receive." The report of the jury and coroner detail Porcher's actions. It states that Porcher "dissected as well the head as the body of the said negro: from which inspection & from the opinion of Doctor Porcher on oath, the verdict was given, that the negro came to his death by the cruelty & violence of his master." The report cites that said operation "was a disagreeable one, as putrefaction had commenced, & the body was approaching fast to decay."

PAR Number 11382316

State: South Carolina Year: 1823
Location: Beaufort Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Dr. Francis Porcher seeks compensation for his slave Welcome who died while working on a public road leading from Savannah to Coosawatchee. Porcher relates that "a great deal of competition was excited among some of the slaves in the execution of the labour that had been assigned them, and in consequence of the great exertions made by your Petitioners slave, he was overcome and died on the spot." Porcher therefore prays "that his case may be taken into consideration by your Honorable House and that such relief as is usually extended to the owners of slaves who are lost in the service of the Public may be granted to him."

PAR Number 11382322

State: South Carolina Year: 1823
Location: Beaufort Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Dr. Francis Porcher seeks compensation for his slave Welcome who died while working on a public road leading from Savannah to Coosawatchee. Porcher relates that "a great deal of competition was excited among some of the slaves in the execution of the labour that had been assigned them, and in consequence of the great exertion made by your Petitioners slave he was overcome and died on the spot." Porcher therefore prays "that his case may be taken into consideration by your Honorable House, and that such relief as is usually extended to the owners of slaves who are lost in the service of the Public may be granted to him." A statement from two public roads commissioners attests that Welcome "was employed as an axeman" and that his exertion coupled with "the heat of the season was the cause of his sudden death." They "consider the said fellow to have been as valuable as most Slaves, and well worth Six hundred Dollars."

PAR Number 11382506

State: South Carolina Year: 1825
Location: Colleton Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: James McKenny laments that his "very valuable Negro fellow" ran away in March 1821 and that a few weeks later "a young man (a youth) ... was hunting & your petitioners fellow came walking up to him when he shot him." The petitioner, "desirous of a remedy for compensation and being poor and almost blind," prays to be granted "such relief as in your wisdom may deem fit."

PAR Number 11382601

State: South Carolina Year: 1826
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: David Haig represents that in 1822 "his Negro Man Slave Harry was convicted & sentenced to death by a Court of Magistrates & Freeholders ... upon the charge of being concerned in the projected insurrection of the Slaves." Haig states that "his sentence of death was reconsidered and commuted to transportation beyond the limits of the United States." He further reports that Harry was "thereupon retained in confinement in the Work-House of Charleston, by order of the Court and out of the control and care of your petitioner." Noting that Harry has died, Haig contends his death resulted "from said confinement" and that “he was thereby deprived of his value & services, as effectually as if the original sentence of the Court had been carried into execution." The petitioner prays he be granted compensation for the loss of Harry, as "the law, in its spirit, if not in its letter, applies to his claim, now with as much force, as it could do under the supposition of his slave having suffered capital punishment."

PAR Number 11382802

State: South Carolina Year: 1828
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: David Haig represents that in 1822 "his Negro Man Slave Harry was convicted & sentenced to death by a Court of Magistrates & Freeholders ... upon the charge of having been concerned in a projected insurrection of the colored population of the City." Haig states that "his sentence of death was reconsidered & commuted to transportation beyond the limits of the United States." He further reports that Harry was "thereupon retained in confinement in the Work House of Charleston, by order of the aforesaid Court and out of the control & care of your Petitioner." Noting that Harry has died, Haig contends "said confinement occasioned the death of the said Slave" and that he “was thereby deprived of his value and Services as effectually as if the original Sentence of the Court had been carried into execution." The petitioner prays he be granted compensation for the loss of Harry, as "the law under this view, applies in its Spirit, if not in its letter, to his claim, now, with as much force as it could do under the Supposition of his slave having Suffered capital punishment."

PAR Number 11382803

State: South Carolina Year: 1828
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: David Haig represents that in 1822 "his Negro Man Slave Harry was convicted & Sentenced to death by a Court of Magistrates & Freeholders ... upon the charge of having been concerned in a projected insurrection of the colored population of the City." Haig states that "his sentence of death was reconsidered & commuted to transportation beyond the limits of the United States." He further reports that Harry was "thereupon retained in confinement in the Workhouse of Charleston by order of the aforesaid Court, and out of the control & care of your Petitioner." Noting that Harry has died, Haig contends "said confinement occasioned the death of the said Slave" and that he “was thereby deprived of his Services as effectually as if the original Sentence of the Court had been carried into execution." The petitioner prays he be granted compensation for the loss of Harry, as "the Law under this View, applies in its Spirit, if not in its letter, to his claim, now, with as much force as it could do under the Supposition of his slave having Suffered capital punishment."

PAR Number 11382807

State: South Carolina Year: 1828
Location: Abbeville Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Reid, "a Practitioner of Medicine," seeks payment of thirty dollars for services rendered to "a Jury of Inquest for the Abbeville District." Reid reports that said jury was assembled "for the purpose of inquiring into the causes which led to the sudden death of a negro woman, named Phillida, the property of Mrs Lucretia J. Finney then in the employment of another person." Reid relates that said Phillida "was supposed to have come to her death from excessive chastisement said to have been inflicted on her" and that he, "as a Physician was required by said Jury of Inquest to examine the dead body of the said negro woman." Believing "himself justly entitled to receive payment of the amount herein after charged," Reid states that $30 is "a moderate and not above the usual charge of Physicians in such cases,” which “he respectfully solicits from the Legislature of the State.”

PAR Number 11383101

State: South Carolina Year: 1831
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Enslow states that his slave John was convicted of "being engaged in a conspiracy and projected insurrection of the Negroes and Sentenced to be imprisoned in the Work House of Charleston untill his Master under the direction of the City Council of Charleston shall send him out of the limits of the United States into which he is not to return Under penalty of death;" said "sentence was in fact a commutation of the punishment of death" due to John's testimony against other slaves. The petitioner further reports that John was therefore duly imprisoned and "that during said confinement he died." Enslow argues that John’s dying in the Workhouse had the same consequence as if he had been executed in that "in either case the property of your Petitioner being taken from him by the public authority, and in the present sentence being dictated by a consideration of the public good." He cites that precedent can be found in the case of David Haig who sued for compensation when his slave Harry died in the Workhouse under the same court-sanctioned sentence. The petitioner therefore prays that his case be taken into consideration and that he be granted "the compensation allowed by Law in case of a Slave executed under the Sentence of a Court."

PAR Number 11383102

State: South Carolina Year: 1831
Location: Fairfield Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: James McCants seeks compensation for the loss of his thirty-year-old slave named March. McCants states that March was one of "forty hands" contracted by "the Commissioners of the Roads Bridges &c" to rebuild a bridge on the Little River. The petitioner recalls that "when some of the props gave way and in the falling of the arch the negro March received an injury in his back or loins of which he shortly afterwards died." Of the belief "that compensation for similar losses has been made by your honorable Body," McCants "trusts that his case will be taken into consideration and such relief granted as the circumstances of the case will authorise."

PAR Number 11383103

State: South Carolina Year: 1831
Location: Claremont Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Bradley seeks compensation for a "Prime field hand" named Moses, who was killed on 19 September 1831 when a tree fell on him while he was working on a public road. Moses was nineteen or twenty years old and "of good Character."

PAR Number 11383109

State: South Carolina Year: 1831
Location: Claremont Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Bradley seeks compensation for a "Prime field hand" named Moses, who was killed on 19 September 1831 when a tree fell on him while he was working on a public road. Moses was nineteen or twenty years old and "of good Character."

PAR Number 11383111

State: South Carolina Year: 1831
Location: Abbeville Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Dr. John S. Reid reports that he "was summoned to attend upon a Jury of Inquest ... for the purpose of enquiring into the causes which led to the sudden death of a negro woman named Phillida the property of Lucretia J. Finney then in the employment of another person, and who was supposed to have come to her death from excessive chastisement said to have been inflicted on her." The petitioner “believes himself justly entitled to receive payment" for his services.

PAR Number 11383112

State: South Carolina Year: 1831
Location: Sumter Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Bradley seeks compensation for his twenty-one-year-old "prime field hand" named Moses, who "whilst at work on the public road in Clermont County Sumter District was killed by the top of a tree which was felled upon him by some other negroes working near him." Bradley contends that Moses "came to his death, not by the act of God, but by the carelessness of the negroes, who felled the tree upon him." Citing that "the said negro man was worth five hundred dollars," Bradley prays said sum "may be paid him by the state with interest."

PAR Number 11383114

State: South Carolina Year: 1831
Location: Fairfield Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: James McCants represents that his thirty-year-old slave named March, "a valuable field hand," received "an injury on his back or loins of which he shortly afterwards died"; March had been employed with "a number of hands perhaps forty to raise the arches" of a bridge spanning Little River. The petitioner therefore "trusts that his case will be taken into consideration and such relief granted as the circumstances of the case will authorize." McCants claims that "he is in very indigent circumstances, and unable to bear the loss."

PAR Number 11383402

State: South Carolina Year: 1834
Location: Charleston Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Charleston resident Edward Carew seeks leniency for his slave Isaac, sentenced to twelve months solitary confinement and three hundred lashes for striking his slave wife in the head with a hoe handle and causing her death. The petitioner believes Isaac will not survive and contends the punishment does not fit the offense. He asserts that "the Case is not distinguishable from many others of conflicts between people of this description -- no such violence was used by the Prisoner as should have excited an apprehension of fatal consequence" and that "the death of Kettura may be regarded in some measure as accidental." Carew further concludes that "the evidence only shews a common instance of a quarrel between a negro and his wife which are of frequent occurrence and not deemed to merit more than moderate correction."

PAR Number 11383504

State: South Carolina Year: 1835
Location: Williamsburgh Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Peter Gourdin seeks compensation for his slave Jack, who was mistakenly shot by a “Gentleman of the patrol” who was attempting to apprehend Abner, a runaway slave convicted of highway robbery. Gourdin notes that there was "considerable disorganization" among the slaves in the neighborhood and many slaves were trying to "destroy the peace and safety of the people" so there was a concerted effort "to bring the offender to punishment and thus to set an example to other persons of his class." The petitioner reveals, however, that the said Abner escaped "by violence from the Gaol of the district" before "the appointed day of execution."

PAR Number 11383505

State: South Carolina Year: 1835
Location: Williamsburgh Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: Peter Gourdin seeks compensation for his slave Jack, who was mistakenly shot by a “Gentleman of the patrol” who was attempting to apprehend Abner, a runaway slave convicted of highway robbery. Gourdin notes that there was "considerable disorganization" among the slaves in the neighborhood and many slaves were trying to "destroy the peace and safety of the people" so there was a concerted effort "to bring the offender to punishment and thus to set an example to other persons of his class." The petitioner reveals, however, that the said Abner escaped "by violence from the Gaol of the district" before "the appointed day of execution."

PAR Number 11383507

State: South Carolina Year: 1835
Location: Sumter Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Bradley seeks compensation for his slave Moses, who was killed by "the falling of a tree" while working on a public road between two plantations in Claremont County, Sumter District. Moses, who was twenty-one or twenty-two years old, was worth five hundred dollars.

PAR Number 11383508

State: South Carolina Year: 1835
Location: Sumter Location Type: District/Parish

Abstract: John Bradley seeks compensation for his slave Moses, who was killed by "the falling of a tree" while working on a public road between two plantations in Claremont County, Sumter District. Moses, who was twenty-one or twenty-two years old, was worth five hundred dollars.

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