Digital Library on American Slavery

Advanced Options

  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 166 records found searching with the name/s 3.
  • Displaying records 1 - 25

Untitled

This record is listed in the Iredell County Book of Deeds: Book G Page 197.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Simon (age: 30)
Slaveholder(s)
Lucy Maberry (Cook)
Others
Mary and Abel Maberry

Untitled

This record is listed in the Iredell County Book of Deeds: Book R Page 234.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Lydia (age: 24), Julius (age: 3), Dovey (age: 1)
Slaveholder(s)
Mary Ramsey
Others
John M. Gray

Untitled

This record is listed in the Iredell County Book of Deeds: Book X Page 190.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Harriet (age: 38), Milus (age: 20), Cecilia (age: 16), Elvira (age: 14), Margaret (age: 8), Louisa (age: 6), Daniel (age: 3), Wilson (age: 16), Eliza (age: 10)
Slaveholder(s)
John H. McKee
Others
Joseph P. Caldwell

Untitled

This record is listed in the Iredell County Book of Deeds: Book W Page 375.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Isabella (age: 3), Tom (age: 2)
Slaveholder(s)
William Welch
Others
Joseph F. Alexander

Untitled

This record is listed in the Iredell County Book of Deeds: Book X Page 396.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Eliza (age: 30), Washington (age: 11), 2 girl children
Slaveholder(s)
P. Houston
Others
John Dalton

Petition 11282721

Nancy Donnell, widow of the late William Donnell, represents that "it is her ardent wish & desire to carry out the will of her deceased Husband" to emancipate seven slaves. Fearing that said emancipation "would not be done after" her death, Donnell discloses that she "Executed to the aforesaid slaves a Deed of emancipation & have had the same duly recorded & attested, with the intention of liberating & sending them away in the life time of your petioner." The petitioner suggests, however, that "a few distant relations, whose covetous & nigardly disposition suffer them, to oppose the object & wish of your petioner in disposing of her own property." Donnell therefore prays that a law be passed "confirming & validating the Acts of the Testator William Donnell & your petioner, as it regards the emancipation of the aforesaid slaves & Authorise your petioner to send them away from this state." The petitioner pledges to "enter into Bond & give Security for any reasonable Sum, that she will remove Said Negroes from this state at any time your body may direct." She further admits that she "cannot die in peace & composedly untill their Freedom is affected."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Biddy, Zaza, Calvin, Lee, Rittey, Lidia, Levinia
Others
Nancy Donnell, William Donnell, Nancy Donnell

Petition 11285002

David Kendall seeks to free his sixty-year-old slave Daniel, who has "bin a faith ful slave and has performed wonderfully his [duties]." Kendall reports that Daniel's father, an old "Colerd man who was liberated about 40 years agoe by the general Assembly" and is called Daniel Shad, "ever supported a good honest character." He also represents that "Daniel the servant to whom I now [petition] your honerable boddy to grant manumition is a slave of good moral and [honest] character."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Daniel
FPoC(s)
Daniel Shad
Others
David Kendall

Petition 11285802

Fifty-eight Onslow County residents represent "that some legislation is absolutely necessary to relieve the people of the State from the evils arising from numbers of free negroes in our midst." The petitioners decry that "the free negro is an indolent lazy & thievish drunken individual, working only when he cannot steal, or induce the slave to steal for him." They further assert that "the slave is induced to enter his owners barn and the free negro is the recipient of the stolen goods; paying for them in whiskey." This results, they declare, in the slave imbibing "untill he become intoxicated, when he is ready for a general fight, or any species of rascality that may present itself." The petitioners argue that "free negroes are a growing evil, and deserve as we have no doubt, it will receive, the attention of the present General Assembly."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Others
Willis Webb, E. J. Newbold, D. Sandlin, S. W. Venters, B. M. Barry, Henry Humphrey, W. D. Humphrey, Stephen Dixon, John A. Ervin, Jasper Etheridge

Petition 20184202

James B. Wallace petitions the court to award him payment helping to settle the John Reynolds estate. Wallace says that James Coopwood and Bennett Driver, administrators of the John Reynolds estate, hired him "to institute and prosecute various suits ... for the recovery of the property, belonging to said estate which had been taken possession of by the Sons and a Son in law of said John Reynolds, in the lifetime of said John, under the pretence of gifts." The property to which these individuals "had no claim in law ... consisted of ten or eleven slaves of great value." Wallace states that these cases required laborious preparation and execution and that due to his legal skills, the estate recovered all of the slaves and gained "several thousand dollars damages for their detention." Therefore the petitioner prays that the court will issue a decree "to pay three hundred dollars, the amount of his demand, out of the property of the estate. The petitioner states that there are now twenty-three slaves in the estate and sufficient cash to satisfy his demand.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Others
James B. Wallace, James M. Coopwood, Bennett Driver, Samuel Henderson

Petition 20184302

On 8 December 1835, Ransom Foulkes and Francis Marshall received the slave Tabby and her three children, Fanny, Richard and Edward, in trust for Harriet Hamblin "to have & enjoy the use & possession of the said slaves & the increase thereof ... & at her death to be equally divided between the children of the said Daniel H & Harriet Hamblin." Harriet died in 1840. By 1843, Tabby has given birth to two more children. Now Harriet's children and the trustees ask for authority to sell the slaves, since "it is impossible to divide the said slaves fairly equally & beneficially among the said children."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Tabby, Fanny, Richard, Edmund, Allen, Booker
Others
Francis Marshall, James D. Hamblin, William T. Hamblin, Harriet C. Hamblin, Ransom Foulkes, Henry Hamblin, John A. Hamblin, Martha M. Hamblin, Robert Hamblin, Reuben C. Crutcher, David Moore, Mary W. Hamblin Moore, Robert C. Cook, Angeline Hamblin Cook, Samuel D. Burk, Harriet W. Hamblin, Harriet W. Hamblin

Petition 20184405

Alcuin Eason, guardian of his half-sister, minor Ann L. Eason, asks the court to confirm the purchase of a slave named Horace and permission to purchase other slaves for the benefit of his ward. Ann owns Horace's wife, Eason explains, and when it was learned that the slave was about to be sent to North Carolina he made the purchase. Horace is "young & extremely valuable by reason of his good health, Sound condition, great Strength and many good qualities." The price of six hundred dollars "was at the time of purchase & is now a small sum for so valuable a Slave."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Horace, Martha, Willis, Tom, Demps, Jack
Others
Alcuin Eason, George Manning, Joseph Exum, Ann L. Eason

Petition 20184409

James Hair, administrator of the estate of Sarah Boyett, charges that Missouri Boyett claims wrongful title to slaves belonging to the estate. Hair notes that Sarah's will, dated 25 November 1841, clearly bequeaths her ten slaves to several of her children. However, on 23 May 1842, Sarah Boyett conveyed the same slaves to Jesse Gibbs who in turn assigned his interest in these slaves to Missouri Boyett. Hair asserts that the conveyance to Gibbs was "nothing more, and nothing else than mortgages of the property ... to secure him in the payment of a large sum of money," which Hair claims was repaid in large part by Boyett before her death. He contends that Sarah Boyett thought that Missouri, her daughter, was acting as her agent in helping her regain ownership of her slaves. But Hair accuses Missouri of "intending, designing and contriving to cheat and defraud the heirs and legatees" and believes that she is planning to carry off said slaves "in a secret and clandestine manner." The petitioner asks that Missouri Boyett be restrained from leaving the state and that the sheriff take the slaves into his possession until the estate is settled.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Abram, Becca, Catharine, Emily, Sina, Joe, Bailus, Henry, Moses, Isham
Others
James Hair, Missouri Boyett, Sarah Boyett

Petition 20184412

In his will, Nathan Sanders of Fairfield District, South Carolina, bequeathed a "certain negro Girl called Sarah" to his wife Mary during her lifetime and following her death to his eldest daughter Elizabeth. If Sarah had children, Nathan said, they should go to his second and third daughters. In 1838, after the deaths of Nathan and his two youngest daughters, Mary moved to Alabama. By then, the slave Sarah had four children, and Sarah's daughter Eve also had several children. In 1839 or 1840, one Robert S. Cowan took possession of Eve and her children, by then four in number, "without consideration and a bill of sale," and placed them in the possession of Thomas Hollingsworth. By 1844, Eve had given birth to one more child. Elizabeth Land seeks to nullify the transaction, explaining that Mary was "very old and infirm" and apparently unaware of what she was doing. Neither did she have authority to sell the slaves. Elizabeth and her husband accuse the two men of fraud, and seek to prevent them from transporting the slaves out of the commonwealth. Related documents reveal that by 1848, two of Eve's children were dead: a boy named Bannister was killed falling off a wagon, and a girl, the youngest child, named Francis. The documents also reveal that by 1848, Mary Sanders had married again. Her new husband was Thomas Godfroy.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Sarah, Sam, Charlott, Milly, Eve, Sam, George, Richard, Bannister, Francis
Others
James Land, Elizabeth Sanders Land, Robert S. Cowan, Thomas Hollingsworth, Mary Sanders, Cowan, Robert S. or Hollingsworth, Thomas, Mary Sanders, Nathan Sanders

Petition 20184607

In 1822, Charles Ewing of Madison County, Alabama, died intestate. Before his death, he gave a slave named Lucy to his son Charles and he gave Lucy's son named Jack to his daughter Sally, as advancement on their inheritance. Charles Ewing had ten children, two sons and several unmarried daughters at the time of his death. After their father's death, his two sons, Joseph and Charles, took in their single sisters, Grizzy, Ann, Jane, and Sally, boarded, lodged, supported, clothed, and schooled them until they were married. In 1827 Charles sold Lucy and her younger child named Willis to the petitioner, John M. McGaughey. Three years later Charles Ewing also sold Jack, whom he had purchased from his sister Sally, to McGaughey. These transactions, McGaughey asserts, were transparent to the other children of Charles Ewing Sr., who for the most part lived in the same neighborhood and never objected over the many years. Somewhat recently, however, a suit has been filed on behalf of the various children and grandchildren of the late Ewing Sr., in order to recover the slaves and their hires. In his suit, McGaughey seeks an injunction to halt the "said suit at law now pending in the circuit Court of Lawrence County," and a decree validating his title to the slaves, who include Jack and his three siblings, Willis, Jane, and Sally. Lucy is now dead.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Lucy, Jack, Willis, Jane, Sally
Others
John M. McGaughey, Alexander Mitchell, John Harris, Grizzy Ewing Harris, Samuel C. Gill, Susan Ewing Gill, Thomas Fulton, Ann Ewing Fulton, Zachariah Fulton, Jane Ewing Fulton, Samuel W. McGaughey, Sally Ewing McGaughey, Joseph Harris, Polly Ewing Nelson, Polly Harris Dobbins, Alexander T. Dobbins, John Armor, Cyrena Harris Armor, Joseph Jamison, Susan Ewing Jamison, William R. Harris, Rhoda Ewing Harris, Charles Ewing, Charles E. Harris, Franklin Harris, John Harris, Rebecca Ewing, William Ewing, James Ewing, Drucilla Ewing, Caroline Ewing, Clementina Ewing, John Ewing, John Jr. Harris, Joseph Harris, Charles Ewing

Petition 20184632

Polly Smith seeks permission to remove eight slaves from the state of Virginia to Limestone County, Alabama. The six children and two adults constitute a life estate for Polly, set up by her father and her husband, with the stipulation that said slaves "should remain in possession of her said father, for the benefit of the said Polly, during her life, and at her death, to go to her children." Now that her father has died, and there is no longer a trustee to oversee the property, Polly seeks to take advantage of "a late Act of the Legislature of Virginia [which] provides for the removal of property in the Situation of this, to other States of the Union there being first a trustee duly appointed and qualified in the State to which it is proposed to remove it." Polly requests the appointment of a new trustee "qualified to remove said property to this County and State and to hold the same in trust as aforesaid."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Stephen, Airy, Peggy, Mason, Bill, Martha, Emeline, Mary
Others
Polly Clements Smith, Richard W. Smith, Patrick H. G. B. Smith, David W. Smith, Emeline P. Smith, Margaret Smith, Charles T. Smith, Polly Clements Smith, Richard P. Clements

Petition 20184633

John M. McGaughey amends his original suit to confirm his title to slaves he bought from Charles Ewing Jr., one of the heirs of the late Charles Ewing Sr. In his amended suit, McGaughey argues that he purchased the slaves when Charles Ewing Jr. was perfectly solvent, and presents the bills of sale as exhibits. He again seeks an injunction to halt the said suit pending against him and requests a decree validating his title to the slaves. The related original bill reveals that three of the slaves, Lucy and her sons, Jack and Willis, had belonged to the late Charles Ewing Sr. During his lifetime, Charles Ewing the elder had given Lucy and Willis to Charles Jr. and Jack to another of his children. Charles Ewing Jr. had purchased Jack from his sibling before selling all three slaves to McCaughey.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Lucy, Willis, Jane, Sally, Jack
Others
John M. McGaughey, John Harris, Grizzy Harris, Samuel C. Gill, Susan Gill, Thomas Fulton, Ann Fulton, Zachariah Fulton, Jane Fulton, Samuel W. McGaughey, Alexander Mitchell, Sally McGaughey, Alexander F. Dobbins, Polly Dobbins, James Ewing, Drucilla Ewing, Polly Nelson, Rebecca Ewing, Charles Ewing, Franklin Harris, John Armor, Cyrina Armor, John Harris, Joseph Harris, John Harris, Elizabeth Mitchell, Caroline Ewing, Clementine Ewing, William Ewing, Joseph Jamison, Susan Jamison, William R. Harris, Rhoda Harris, Charles Ewing

Petition 20184706

In 1832, William Lewis died intestate, leaving a widow, Catharine, and four children, Mary, John, Charles, and Joseph. Catharine and George Connally became administrators of the estate. In 1834, Catharine married Cortez D. Kavanaugh, and Kavanaugh became administrator of the estate by virtue of hi marriage to Catherine, as well as the children's guardian. In 1835, a man named John Blevins, without the consent of the administrator or guardian, took "Little Bill," a slave belonging to the estate, to south Alabama. During that year Little Bill died. Kavanaugh agreed not to prosecute Blevins if he would replace Little Bill, and Blevins did so in February 1837, purchasing a slave named Jack, for $1050, and turning him over to Kavanaugh. According to the Lewis children, the bill of sale was erroneously drawn in Kavanaugh's name rather than to the estate he administered. And now Kavanaugh, who is insolvent, claims Jack as his own property. The petitioners seek an injunction to prevent Kavanaugh or his creditors from selling or disposing of the slave; they also seek a decree "to convey said negro Jack to said distributees."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Bill, Jack
Others
Mary E. Lewis Thomson, John C. Lewis, Alexander Ewing, Charles Lewis, Joseph Lewis, William H. Thomson, Samuel Beck, Cortez D. Kavanaugh, Catharine Lewis Kavanaugh, George Connally, William D. Hollowell, William Echolls, John Patton, William Patton, John B. Eldridge, George P. Beirne, Stephen S. Ewing, John J. Walker, William Lewis, John Blevins, Hollowell, William D. & Echolls, William

Petition 20184717

In his will, Nathan Sanders of Fairfield District, South Carolina, bequeathed "certain negro Girl called Sarah" to his wife Mary during her lifetime and following her death to his eldest daughter Elizabeth. If Sarah had children, Nathan said, they should go to his second and third daughters. In 1838, following Nathan's death (and the deaths of his two youngest daughters), Mary moved to Alabama, to be near Elizabeth. By then, Sarah had four children, and Sarah's daughter Eve had five children. In 1839 or 1840, Mary sold Eve and her children to Robert S. Cowan and Thomas Hollingsworth "without consideration and a bill of sale." In 18444, Elizabeth initiated a suit to recover her slaves. Now married to James Land, she comes back to court to add her mother's second husband, Thomas Godfrey, to her original bill and pursue the recovery of her slaves, and damages equal to the value of their hire.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Sarah, Eve, Bannister
Others
James Land, Elizabeth Sanders Land, Robert S. Cowan, Thomas Hollingsworth, Thomas Godfrey, Mary Sanders Godfrey, Nathan Sanders, Cowan, Robert S. &/or Hollingsworth, Thomas

Petition 20184902

At her death in 1823, Elizabeth Brewer of Limestone County bequeathed to her daughter Mary Horton, wife of John B. Horton, two female slaves, Winney and Harriet. The slaves were to be given to Mary in the form of a life estate. According to the terms of the will, at Mary's death the slaves would go to Brewer's grandchildren. In time, the slave Winney gave birth to three children: Lina, Alick, and John, and in 1844 the slave Harriet died in childbirth, leaving a daughter named Mary (frequently called Molly). The baby slave Mary was entrusted to the care of Mary Horton's daughter, Maranda who, "by great care and attention personally bestowed by her in nurturing said child, succeeded in raising it, and ... she was assured by her father, and sisters, that she should have said girl Molly, in addition to her distributive share of the balance of said slaves." Mary Horton died in 1836. Maranda has recently married John P. Willis, and her father has taken the young slave Mary from her possession. Now, Maranda and her new husband seek to regain possession of Mary as well as acquire a distributive share of the other slaves--Linda, now about twenty-one, Alick about nineteen, and John about sixteen.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Winney, Lina, Alick, John, Harriet, Mary, Willis, Jo, Vina, Mary
Others
John P. Willis, Maranda C. Horton Willis, John B. Horton, Thomas W. Martin, Elizabeth Jane Horton Martin, John Seay, Thomas M. Moseley, William B. Horton, Mary Brewer Horton, Mary Brewer Horton, John B. & Mary Brewer Horton, Elizabeth Brewer

Petition 20184907

Alcuin Eason, guardian of Ann Eason, explains that he has purchased six slaves for the benefit of his ward, but is now unable to make additional investments because of the high prices of property. Consequently, he has invested more than one thousand dollars "at interest for her benefit," and asks for additional time to invest "untill the same can be done advantageously."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Others
Alcuin Eason

Petition 20185118

In 1849, Jonathan Bliss obtained a judgment against William H. Thompson for a substantial amount of money. He explains that before he filed his suit Thompson (either by himself or with John B. Thompson) had purchased from his father James Thompson, and then transferred to James H. Thompson and William W. Thompson, "certain lands & negro slaves & other property of great value to whit of the value of Ten Thousand Dollars." Bliss charges that this transfer was fraudulent, made to keep creditors from obtaining their judgments. Now the father has died and William H. Thompson is "entitled to share & distribution of his real & personal estate whatever it may be." Bliss requests that Thompson's portion of the father's estate be "subjected to the payment of your orators said judgment."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Others
Jonathan Bliss, William H. Thompson, James H. Thompson, William W. Thompson

Petition 20185120

Alcuin Eason, guardian of Ann L. Eason, minor, explains that he is about to make a final settlement of his ward's estate as she has now reached the age of twenty-one. He asks that the chancery court "ratify and confirm" the purchase of slaves for Ann's benefit, and the more than one thousand dollars remaining in the account. He also requests to be "discharged from his said trust."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Others
Alcuin Eason

Petition 20185204

Emily Cornelius states that she had fled from her home with her three-month-old son, for fear of the violence inflicted on her by her husband, William Cornelius, a "habitual drunkard." She contends that William treated her in a most "cruel barbarous & inhuman" manner; he inflicted "violent blows with his fists & feet;" and he menaced her with threats of "the most dreadful character" including death. On one occasion, in a drunken rage, he even struck his own mother, who lived on the plantation. Emily seeks a divorce, custody of the child, and alimony as the court "may deem meet." Cornelius is a man of considerable wealth and property, Emily explains, worth between thirty-five and forty thousand dollars. He owns more than eight hundred acres of plantation land and "about thirty five" slaves. In addition, he "has a valuable crop of Corn & Cotton growing on his said plantation & a considerable Amount of good debts due to him." In response, Cornelius admitted that he occasionally drank to excess, but denied that he ever physically abused his wife. In any event, she knew he drank from the beginning. On their wedding day in 1845 he could barely stand and suffered from one of the "worst of his paroxysms of intoxication" during his life.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Harriet, Jim, Thurston, Chaney, Miles, Horace, Andy, Bake, Buck, Moses, Joe, Bill, Dennis, Patience, Lena, Katy, Evelina, Solomon, Sarah, Jane, Charlotte, George, Larkin, Frances, Mary, Bob
Others
Robert True, Emily Coyle Cornelius, William Cornelius, Ellenor Cornelius, William Coyle

Petition 20185530

Protesting the claim that Isaac Rawdon brought very little property to his marriage, Thomas Rawdon , Isaac's brother, contends that shortly after Isaac arrived in Alabama, he purchased four half-sections of land (180 acres each) and a tract containing fifty or sixty acres. He also brought with him several slaves, six of whom, Thomas asserts, he had purchased with money given to him by his father. Isaac, who had killed his son during one of his bouts of insanity, was committed to a Georgia insane asylum. Shortly before his commitment, he sold the land for $6,900, and his former wife, Lydia Rawdon, has collected the money and retained the profits thereof. Thomas Rawdon asks that Lydia Rawdon be ordered to provide an account of her activities and that a "Committee or Guardian for the estate of the said Isaac be appointed."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Mary, Sip, Ben, Jim, Nance, Fany, Joshua, Harry, Sip, Mose, Till, Nancy, Hannah, Lucy, Mariah, Rachel, John, John, Ben
Others
Thomas Rawdon, Isaac Rawdon, Lydia Miller Rawdon

Petition 20186031

In 1834, Person Davis gave his recently married son, Ransom Davis, three slave children, two boys and a girl. He also let his son have two older slaves on loan until such time when he would give him two other slaves. Following Ransom's premature death in 1835, Person Davis made an agreement with his widowed daughter-in-law, whereby he would hold the three young slaves until they were old enough to be hired out; then when Ransom's daughter, Maria, reached twenty-one he would "account to her for them & [their] hire" as her distributive share of her father's estate. Person Davis never settled the estate and when he died, in 1856, the slaves constituted a sizeable property, the female slave, Margaret, having given birth to several children. In 1860, at the time Maria Davis, now married to Benjamin Reisor, sues the numerous heirs of her grandfather's estate, the slaves who have increased to eleven are valued at nearly nine thousand dollars. She seeks possession of the slaves as well as compensation equal to their past hire.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Ausborn, Margaret, Ellis, Jack, Mary, Martin, Kitty, Allen, Anderson, Ben, John, Edmond, Mary
Others
Maria S. Davis Reisor, Benjamin F. Reisor, Alexander Bowie, James P. Davis, John W. Moore, Lucy J. Moore, Mary J. Span, Mary A. Benning, Ann Olds, Karenhappuch Sorrell, James M. Sorrell, Wiley Sorrell, Calvin Conly, Thomas Caver, S. G. Span, William P. Benning, William H. Olds, George Sorrell, Martha Davis, Mary E. Davis, Nancy Davis, Mariah Walker, Ida Walker, Mary J. George, Columbus George, Alabama E. Green, Frank Green, Mary Bass, Laurence L. Bass, Person A. Davis, Henrietta Bass, George W. Bass, Thomas J. Bass, Cordelia Bass, William Davis, Mary E. Davis, Laurence L. Davis, Henry Davis, Franklin Barnes, William Foreman, John P. Sorrell, Person Davis, Ransom Davis, Ransom Davis, James N. Foreman, Karenhappuch & James M. Sorrell

Maintained by ERIT, University Libraries, UNCG