Digital Library on American Slavery

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Within the Digital Library on American Slavery

Race and Slavery Petitions Project

The Race and Slavery Petitions Project offers data on race and slavery extracted from eighteenth and nineteenth-century documents and processed over a period of eighteen years. The Project contains detailed information on about 150,000 individuals, including slaves, free people of color, and whites, extracted from 2,975 legislative petitions and 14,512 county court petitions, as well as from a wide range of related documents, including wills, inventories, deeds, bills of sale, depositions, court proceedings, amended petitions, among others. Buried in these documents are the names and other data on roughly 80,000 slaves, 8,000 free people of color, and 62,000 whites, both slave owners and non-slave owners.

NC Runaway Slave Advertisements

The North Carolina Runaway Slave Advertisements project provides online access to all known runaway slave advertisements (more than 2300 items) published in North Carolina newspapers from 1751 to 1840. These brief ads provide a glimpse into the social, economic, and cultural world of the American slave system and the specific experience within North Carolina. The NCRSA website includes digital scans of the ads, contextual essays to address their historical research value, full text transcripts, an annotated bibliography to aid researchers, and a searchable database.

Slave Deeds of Buncombe County, NC

The Buncombe County Register of Deeds office has kept property records since the late 1700's, wherein one can find a wealth of information about the history of the community. The Register of Deeds have compiled a list of the documents that record the trade of people as slaves in Buncombe County. These people were considered "property" prior to end of the Civil War; therefore these transfers were recorded in the Register of Deeds office. Their listings detail the book and page number where the deed is located in their record books as well as the seller (grantor) and buyer (grantee) of the "property." Each original document is viewable online.

A black family at the Hermitage Plantation, Savannah, Georgia, USA, about 1907 © John Tewell; John Brown's Farmhouse © Tony Fischer.
Licensed via Creative Commons 2.0

Maintained by ERIT, University Libraries, UNCG