Digital Library on American Slavery

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  • 5 records found searching with the name/s royston.
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Petition 11683811

Thirty-seven residents of Northumberland County believe "that a large majority of the good people of this Commonwealth favorably regard the great Colonization Scheme, and that when this disposition is definitely expressed the Legislature will promptly extend to the cause that assistance which the people are anxious, through them, to bestow." They further "cordially bear testimony to the oft-repeated fact, that free persons of colour among us, are the most degraded, as well as the most wretched class of our population and we believe that nothing short of colonizing them in Africa, could be done to ameliorate effectually their condition." The petitioners point out that "it is the design of the Virginia Colonization Society, if the requisite funds can be obtained, to establish in Africa a new colony, called, 'New Virginia', to consist of settlers from our own State"; they admit, however, that "to carry out this design seems impossible without legislative aid." They therefore pray "the continuance of the Act of 1833-34 -- that is, an appropriation, free from all restrictions which would render it unavailable, of $18,000 annually for five years, from the 3rd of March next ensuing."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Others
Austin Haynie, J. M. Jennings, Richard Henry Ball, Frederick B. Gaskins, Paul Hull, William Harding, Walter Rice, Royston Betts, M. B. Cralle, Joseph H. Taylor

Petition 11686012

As advocates "for the perpetuation of the present social relations of Virginia, for the maintenance of peace within her borders, and for a community of interest amongst her citizens,” forty-two residents of Frederick, Jefferson, and Clarke counties seek to bring the ownership of "negro property within the means of the Poor as well as of the Rich," by asking that "a limited amount of such property"--equal to the value of "one good slave"--be exempt from "all legal process for debt," including judgments, executions, and liens. They "believe that under such a law many mechanics and laboring men generally would purchase one servant to wait on their families, and thus that the strong bonds of a common interest would be added to the social feeling which impels the citizens of Virginia to resist alike invasion from without and treason at home."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Others
John W. Hibbord, George R. Royston, James W. Ryan, William N. Nelson, Cornelius Hawkins, John Kelly, Charles H. Richards, Beverly Randolph, John W. Holland, William A. Bradford [Dr.]

Petition 20681815

Richard C. Royston, administrator of Robert Royston's estate, petitions to redeem a slave named Tom from Arthur Foster. Robert Royston borrowed $350 from Foster, and provided Tom as security for the debt. The two drew up a bill of sale, with the stipulation that Royston would receive the slave back if he paid the debt within six months. Richard Royston states that he has been eager to settle Robert's debt with Foster, but Foster has refused to surrender the slave, insisting that the transaction reflected a purchase. Royston asks that Foster deliver up the slave.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Tom
Others
Richard C. Royston, Arthur Foster, Robert Royston

Petition 20986304

Alexander Scott and his wife, Greasey Scott, join E. Preston in stating that Robert Royston filed a petition on 23 November 1862, praying that "a paper purporting to be the last will and testament of Isaac Howard negro ... not be admitted to probate." The petitioners ask the court to transmit two issues to the Baltimore County Circuit Court for trial. They want to know if Isaac Howard was the "slave and property" of Robert Royston when Howard made his will and when he died, and if Howard was the property of Royston and "therefore had no property to bequeath or will."

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Isaac Howard
Others
Alexander Scott, Greasey Scott, E. Preston, Robert Royston

Petition 21381206

Several heirs of Elizabeth Wrenwick Nichols sue her executors for an account and division of the estate. By a deed of 1784 and a later will, Solomon Nichols gave a life interest in his personal estate to his wife Elizabeth, with the remainder of the estate to be divided equally between her children after her death. In 1796 Elizabeth Nichols wrote her will, giving several specific bequests but also directing that the rest of her estate be divided between her children when they turned twenty-one years old. Upon her death in 1806, Elizabeth's sons, John Wrenwick and William Wrenwick, became her executors and took possession of both estates. Agness Wrenrick, Elizabeth's daughter, and Jabez Gantt and Solomon Royston, Elizabeth's grandsons, charge that John and William have not filed the required yearly reports, nor will they divide the property with the other heirs. The petitioners also fear that William will waste the property and leave the state. They ask the court to compel the executors to render their accounts and to distribute the property. They also ask for a writ of ne exeat against William to prevent him from leaving the state.

Individuals Mentioned By Name

Slave(s)
Bett, Prince, Dick, Sarah, Flora
Others
Agness Wrenwick, Jabez Gantt, Solomon Royston, John Wrenwick, William Wrenwick, Elizabeth Wrenwick Nichols, Solomon Nichols, Solomon Nicohols

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