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Finding Aid for the North Carolina Speaker Ban Collection, 1965-1988

For reference questions, please contact university_manuscripts@uncg.edu.

Abstract

The North Carolina Speaker Ban Law was passed in 1963 to forbid communists from speaking on any of the campuses of the University of North Carolina. Students and faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill opposed the law and requested permission to invite controversial speakers Herbert Aptheker and Frank Wilkinson to their campus. Chancellor Joseph Carlyle Sitterson denied the request, which was used as the basis of a lawsuit that resulted in a U.S. District Court in Greensboro, North Carolina overturning the law in 1968.

The North Carolina Speaker Ban Collection dates from 1965 to1988 and contains depositions, exhibits, testimonies and other documents from judicial hearings.

Administrative Information

Collection Number

MSS 097

Extent

1 box.

Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Copyright Notice

Copyright is retained by the creators of items in these papers, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], North Carolina Speaker Ban Collection (MSS 097), University Archives and Manuscripts, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Acquisitions Information

These materials were gathered by librarian Charles M. Adams with the assistance of McNeill Smith and others.

Historical Note

The North Carolina General Assembly passed the North Carolina Speaker Ban Law on June 26, 1963. The law forbade known members of the Communist Party and individuals who had invoked the fifth amendment in connection with congressional investigations of communist activities from speaking on any of the campuses of the University of North Carolina.

Many students and faculty members at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) opposed the speaker ban law. They invited Herbert Aptheker (an outspoken, self-described communist) and Frank Wilkinson (a well-known critic of the House Un-American Activities Committee) to speak on their campus.

UNC-CH Chancellor Joseph Carlyle ("Lyle") Sitterson denied the students' request to allow Aptheker and Wilkinson to speak on campus. This denial was used as the basis for a lawsuit that resulted in a U.S. District Court in Greensboro, North Carolina overturning the speaker ban law in 1968.

Description of Collection

The North Carolina Speaker Ban Collection dates from 1965 to1988 and contains depositions, exhibits, testimonies and other documents from judicial hearings.

[Unnumbered folder] Correspondence

A-1. Complaint

A-2. “The Marxist-Leninist World Outlook"

A-3. Supplemental memorandum of additional authorities

B-1. Deposition of Leonard Patterson

B-2. Patterson--Defendant’s exhibit #1, quotation from New Program of the Communist Party USA

C-1. Deposition of John Lautner

C-2. On the theory of Marxism-Leninism

C-3. Statement of 81 Communist and Workers' parties meeting in Moscow in 1960

C-4. New Program of the Communist Party USA (A draft)

D-1. Witness, Bonaro W. Overstreet

D-2. Quotation from Fundamentals of Marxism-Leninism, 2nd rev.ed.

D-3. Communist Youth Program, hearings

D-4. "What we must know about Communism"

D-5. "Education for survival in the struggle against world communism"

E-1. Deposition of J. Carlyle Sitterson

E-2. Letter to President William Friday from Paul F. Sharp

E-3. Resolution #1; Resolution #2 (2 copies)

E-4. Letter from Corydon Spruill to Chancellor Sitterson (2 copies)

E-5. Letter to members of the faculty from J. Carlyle Sitterson (2 copies)

E-6. Greensboro Daily News article: "Sitterson Philosophy"

E-7. Letter to D. Edward Hudgins from J.B. Fordham

F-1. Deposition of David M. Britt

F-2. Exhibit #1

F-3. Message of the Hon. Dan K. Moore to the extra session of the General Assembly of North Carolina

F-4. Control of subversive activities.

F-5. 2 letters from J. Edgar Hoover to Hoover Adams, editor of the Dunn, NC Daily Record

F-6. Speech of J. Edgar Hoover, Washington, DC, October19, 1965

F-7. Keys to freedom (remarks of J. Edgar Hoover)

F-8. An American's Challenge ( J .Edgar Hoover)

F-9. 13th report, un-American activities, California 1965

F-10. Paragraph 18 on plaintiffs' proposed statement of proof

F-11. The decline of freedom at Berkeley

F-12. The Berkeley Controversy, 1964-65

G-1. Exhibit 1: Statement of proof (2 copies)

G-2. Stipulation of the parties

H-1. Memorandum on the NC Speaker-Ban Law

H-2. AAUP: A statement to the NC Commission appointed to study the Act to regulate visiting speakers.

H-3. Motion of the AAUP and the NC Conference

H-4. Answer of the defendants to the motion and brief of the AAUP

J-1. Brief for the defendants

J-2. Reply brief for the defendants

K-1. Statement of the plaintiffs (3 copies)

L-1. List of documents (2 copies) no. 1-28

Hearings before the Speaker-Ban Study Commission, State Legislative Building, Raleigh, 1966. 7 volumes.

  1. Testimony of the Southern Assn. of Colleges and Schools
  2. Testimony of Dr. Howard Boozer
  3. Testimony of the AAUP
  4. Presentation by the NC Department of the American Legion
  5. Statements—administrative officers of the University
  6. Administrative Officers and Trustees of the University of North Carolina and state-supported colleges
  7. Students, organization representatives, alumni of the University

Sound recordings:

Six sound cassettes of interviews conducted by William Stewart (Ed.D. 1988) with the following individuals: William C. Friday, C. Sitterson, Robert Morgan, James Medford, and Dr. A.K. King, January to November 1987.

Related Materials

See more UNCG manuscript collections related to the history of education and politics, and the history of North Carolina.