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The Betty H. Carter Women Veterans Historical Project

Letter from Jean Holdridge Reeves to parents, 1945

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Object ID: WV0383.4.018

Description: Jean Holdridge (Reeves) and Tom Reeves have attempted to cheer a sick friend. She gives detailed descriptions of Tom and Pat, answers her mother's questions, and expresses unhappiness with the strictness of a new Colonel.

Creator: Jean Holdridge Reeves

Biographical Info: Jean Holdridge Reeves (b. 1920) of Marion, Ohio, served in the Pacific as a member of the Red Cross from 1944 to 1946.

Collection: Jean Holdridge Reeves Papers

Rights: It is responsibility of the user to follow the copyright law of the United States (Title 17, U.S. Code). Materials are not to be reproduced in published works without written consent, and any use should credit Jackson Library, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Full Text: Dearest Folks,

Another half a week gone by I do declare— time goes so rapidly. Monday Pat went to the hospital with a fever so I wrote Betty a poem for him which Tom and I took out in the evening. In the line where he would only get well by taking some of Betty’s pills I inserted “smell” instead. Then took 2 handkerchiefs and on each one of her favorite perfumes. Was she surprised the next day when Pat thanked her for them. He was out today on pass will be discharged tomorrow. If he had dengue fever he certainly got over it in a hurry.

Yes, I still have my atlas but we are not in it by name. However, there is a city named which is close by.

By now you must be in Ohio with Melissa, Kay and all the family. It would be nice to be there for the celebration and to help you get settled. Right now we are doing some of our own, however. Have the dressing table built in and have decided to put light blue linen around it and cover that with white silk parachute. Above the dressing table will be two large metal mirrors and three fluorescent lights which Tom is fixing for us.

Tom certainly is good company and has been so wonderful to us. There isn’t anything he wouldn’t do for us or give to us and we feel perfectly free to go to his “home” anytime. Did I describe Pat and Tom to you? Haven’t any good pictures yet but when I get one I'll send it. Tom is 5’ 9 1/2” tall, dark brown hair and eyes weighs 160 pounds. Is from North Carolina so says certain words with a definite accent. He’s in his field pretty much now as an Engineer although his major at North Carolina State was agriculture engineering. He was doing that kind of work for the state when he entered the Army 3 years ago— 20 months of which he’s been overseas and right here most of the time. Even at that he’s an extremely happy person— one with whom you can’t fight but always enjoy yourself and be natural.

Pat, being Italian, is much more excitable and his big brown eyes and long eyelashes glisten constantly. Pat is 23 while Tom is 26. There is more difference in actions and thinking, however. Pat not acting as old as his years and Tom is more mature than many 26’s. He is about 6’ tall, slender, dark curly hair and much the happy-go-lucky type. Pat is from New York, I believe, didn’t go on to college and now regrets is sort of. Forgotten just what he did.

April 5

Didn’t get this finished yesterday so will carry on now. I enjoyed your letter of Mar. 25 so much. Daddy, you have been very busy getting ready to leave and I hope got some rest on the way to Ohio. At least you can take a few days now.

We are having “Colonel trouble” here. A man just over from the states with lots of GI ideas. Pretty soon we’ll probably be standing reveille and retreat. It is very places overseas that they stick to such strictness. We wear our colored socks and ribbons on the 2T— but know most girls don’t want to lose all femininity so we keep hanging on.

Bye for now. Just go home from work. I’m trying to take your good advice and keep my feet on the ground, Daddy honey. Will keep you informed about progress. At least you don’t have to worry about Jim anymore— what a load off your mind.

Love to each of you,

Jean