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The Betty H. Carter Women Veterans Historical Project

Letter from Annie Pozyck to her parents, 1945

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Object ID: WV0333.4.008

Description: Pozyck has landed on an island in the Philippines and is stationed at the 133rd General Hospital until another hospital is completed. She describes living in a tent camp in thick mud, washing herself and her clothes using only her helmet, and eating fresh coconut.

Creator: Annie Edith Sherrill Pozyck

Biographical Info: Annie Edith Sherrill Pozyck (1920-2007) of Concord, North Carolina, served in the Army Nurse Corps during World War II. After her discharge, she continued her nursing career, retiring from the Salisbury, North Carolina, VA Hospital after over twenty-five years in the profession.

Collection: Annie Pozyck Papers

Rights: It is responsibility of the user to follow the copyright law of the United States (Title 17, U.S. Code). Materials are not to be reproduced in published works without written consent, and any use should credit Jackson Library, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Full Text: Dearest Mother & Daddy,

Well, here we are at our destination & you can see where we are. Of course I can’t tell you exactly where on the islands, but it sure is pretty rugged.

We were landed on the island in landing barges, & you should have seen us climbing down the ladder off the ship into the barge. It was a pretty rough ride in to shore too.

When we got to shore we were brought out here to the 133rd Gen. Hosp. to stay until our men get our hospital set up in another area & then we are going to move.

We are living in tents, & I’m writing this by flashlight. We have no lights, but I hope we will by tomorrow night. There are nine of us in the tent & we have a swell bunch of girls to live with. We have no showers & the only [way] we have to wash is in our helmets- us, clothes & all!!! The place isn’t very well fixed up because the hospital hasn’t been here too long.

The mud here is inches thick. We wear high top shoes, & sometimes the mud even comes up over that. It’s really “gooey” too. You can’t imagine it until you see it.

The food hasn’t been too bad so far. Lot[s] of the stuff is dehydrated & we have powdered milk.

It seems that I have so much to say I hardly know where to start I think of so many things to say at once.

This afternoon we had fresh coconut & coconut milk off the palm trees right from our front yard. They’re all around us here. Believe me we’re really in the “wilds.” We have to cross a bridge over a swamp to get to our tent. All of the nurses live in one little area. They all live in tents.

I just finished washing my self, my clothes, & my shoes so I can continue my writing. I caught a helmet of rain water to wash in. they say rain water makes you pretty, so I’ll be beautiful when I come home.

The drinking water isn’t too good. Its pure but tastes pretty bad, so every time we fill our canteen we put a couple of lemon drops in to help the taste.

Well I think I’ll stop for now. Hope you have gotten some of the letters I wrote on the ship. I’m fine and I guess that’s the most important thing after all. Hope all is well at home & that I’ll hear from you soon.

Lots of love Annie Edith