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Walking Through Greensboro's Past

Walking Through Greensboro's Past is a Fall 2006 graduate student class project at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Its purpose was to bring real-world meaning to history readings and lectures and to give students a chance to interpret southern history for the public. Each of the 2006 tours integrates books, archives, interviews, and the physical landscape to bring Greensboro's past alive. Download these podcasts and tour maps and experience local history for yourself!

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FROM OLE ASHEBORO TO NEW SOUTHSIDE: THE EVOLUTION OF A COMMUNITY

The Southside neighborhood has existed for nearly as long as Greensboro itself, and has changed along with the city. This neighborhood, which began as an upperclass area, has born witness to Reconstruction, integration, as well as various reinventions. The history of Southside in many ways is a microcosm of the history of the South itself, ebbing and flowing with the tide of the region.

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APRIL 1865: CHAOS AND COLLAPSE IN CONFEDERATE GREENSBORO

Paroling rebel prisoners at Greensborough, North Carolina. Harper's Weekly, June 3, 1865, p. 340The end of the Civil War is often remembered as a "Gentlemen's Agreement," a quiet affair in which opposing generals approve surrender terms to end hostilities, but this peaceful conclusion was not Greensboro's reality, where moral outrage and desperation ignited a violent social protest against the war.

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THE GREENSBORO MASSACRE: 88 SECONDS THAT REFUSE TO END

 Police in Greensboro restrain suspects after the shootings on Nov. 3, 1979. Courtesy Greensboro Daily News Eighty-eight seconds of violence on November 3, 1979, originated within the deep racial and class divisions that existed in Greensboro. The murderous actions of Klan and Nazis responded to a Communist led movement that called for social justice in a neighborhood forgotten by Greensboro's white middle class. Since that tragedy, the citizens of Greensboro have struggled to reconcile themselves to that tragic event and to the conflicted legacy that it has bestowed on their city.

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IN HER SHOES: A WALK THROUGH UNCG DURING THE GREAT DEPRESSION

Join us in an exploration of UNC Greensboro during the Great Depression. Follow the lives of the girls who once walked this campus and learn about the first male students to attend classes here. See how the school struggled with budget cuts and reduced amenities for students, while still striving to provide them with everything necessary to ensure their wellbeing.

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