Textiles, Teachers, and Troops

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 1880-1945

1326 records found browsing for the years 1920-1930.

This is the Greensboro city directory from 1920, published by the Hill Directory Co. "Containing an alphabetically arranged list of business firms and private citizens; a classified list of all trades, professions and pursuits; a street and avenue directory in numerical order; head of households; a miscellaneous directory of the city, county and state officers, public and private schools, churches, secret and benevolent societies, etc."-p. [5]. The directory also includes a brief overview of North Carolina, Guilford County, and Greensboro, and a list of North Carolina post offices.

Collection: NC Collection (Greensboro Public Library)

Subjects: Greensboro (N.C.) -- Directories


The 1920 yearbook is the first under the name Pine Needles. It includes senior class statistics, 1920 class history, and a section for the special class, who attend only one year. Also includes a section titled “War Time Features,” summarizing students’ contributions toward the war effort. The yearbook of the institution now known as The University of North Carolina at Greensboro was published between 1902 and 1993, first as The Decennial (1902), later as The Carolinian (1909-1917), and finally as Pine Needles (1920-1993).

Collection: UA42.4.03 Pine Needles (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: North Carolina College for Women; North Carolina College for Women--Students--Yearbooks; Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; Woman's College of the University of North Carolina--Students--Yearbooks; University of North Carolina at Greensboro; University of North Carolina at Greensboro--Students--Yearbooks


Guilford College yearbook.

Collection: The Quaker (Friends Historical Collection, Hege Library, Guilford College)

Subjects: Guilford College


Old Curry Building, circa 1920. The Curry Building, located on College Avenue, opened in 1902. It was named in honor of Jabez Lamar Monroe Curry, who advocated for the establishment of the State Normal and Industrial School (now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro), in the early 1890s. The building was used as a training, or practice, school for future teachers until it burned in1926.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This photograph show the bridge leading to the dining halls. Kirkland Residence Hall is on the left and the Woman's Hall is on the right. The Dining Halls complex was built over a span of thirty-five years. Spencer Dining Hall was built in 1904, West (later Spartan) Dining Hall in 1921, South Dining Hall (later State) in 1924, Kitchen in 1927, and North Dining Hall in 1939. The four dining rooms and kitchen extend like spokes from the hub of a wheel. The complex was renovated in 1987-1988. At that time, a post office was added to the atrium, which remains the main point of campus mail distribution.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


The South Dining Hall, pictured in the 1920s or 1930s, is seen with tables set and prepared for the next meal. The Dining Halls complex was built over a span of thirty-five years. Spencer Dining Hall was built in 1904, West (later Spartan) Dining Hall in 1921, South Dining Hall (later State) in 1924, Kitchen in 1927, and North Dining Hall in 1939. The four dining rooms and kitchen extend like spokes from the hub of a wheel. The complex was renovated in 1987-1988. At that time, a post office was added to the atrium, which remains the main point of campus mail distribution.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Photograph of the North Spencer Residence Hall, looking north along College Avenue, circa 1910s or 1920s. The Spencer Residence Hall, designed by W. C. Holleyman of Greensboro, North Carolina, consists of two connect building; North Spencer Residence Hall, which opened in 1904, and South Spencer Residence Hall, which opened in 1907. The building was named in honor of Cornelia Phillips Spencer, a poet, social historian, and journalist. She was instrumental in having the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill reopened after Reconstruction.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Photograph of cars parked in front of the east wing of the McIver Memorial Building in 1920. The McIver Memorial Building, opened in 1908, was named in honor of Charles Duncan McIver, founder and first president of the University. An east wing was added in 1920 and a west wing in 1922. It was declared unsafe in 1956 and razed in 1958.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Photograph of the McIver Memorial Building showing east wing addition on the right in 1920. The McIver Memorial Building, opened in 1908, was named in honor of Charles Duncan McIver, founder and first president of the University. An east wing was added in 1920 and a west wing in 1922. It was declared unsafe in 1956 and razed in 1958.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Aerial view of South and North Spencer Residence Halls, with people walking College Avenue in front to the building around 1920. The Spencer Dining Hall and kitchen sits behind South Spencer Residence Hall, the roof of the Students Building is visible in the foreground, and the Walker Bridge can be seen in the lower right. The Spencer Residence Hall, designed by W. C. Holleyman of Greensboro, North Carolina, consists of two connect building; North Spencer Residence Hall, which opened in 1904, and South Spencer Residence Hall, which opened in 1907. The building was named in honor of Cornelia Phillips Spencer, a poet, social historian, and journalist. She was instrumental in having the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill reopened after Reconstruction. Dining Halls Complex – The Dining Halls complex was built over a span of thirty-five years. Spencer Dining Hall was built in 1904, West (later Spartan) Dining Hall in 1921, South Dining Hall (later State) in 1924, Kitchen in 1927, and North Dining Hall in 1939. The four dining rooms and kitchen extend like spokes from the hub of a wheel. The complex was renovated in 1987-1988. The cornerstone of the Students Building was laid in 1902. Contributions from students, faculty, and visiting speakers allowed the completion of the three story structure in 1906. It housed the Domestic Science and Manual Training Departments, the post office and book store, society halls, a banquet hall, and a 700 seat auditorium. The building was razed in 1950.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Summer House at the entrance to Peabody Park, circa 1920s. The Summer House, located just east of the Weil-Winfield Resident Halls, was a wooden structure built between 1902 and 1909. Allegedly built from logs salvaged from the original Guilford County Courthouse, it was razed in 1954 to add a road to the Anna M. Gove Infirmary.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This photograph shows the Students' Building as seen from across College Avenue, circa 1920. The cornerstone of the Students Building was laid in 1902. Contributions from students, faculty, and visiting speakers allowed the completion of the three story structure in 1906. It housed the Domestic Science and Manual Training Departments, the post office and book store, society halls, a banquet hall, and a 700 seat auditorium. The building was razed in 1950.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Summer House in Peabody Park, circa 1920s. The back of the photograph reads "Timbers from Guilford Co. Courthouse" and a note that says that statement is in the handwriting of Dr. Anna Gove but never verified, by M. Hood. The Summer House, located just east of the Weil-Winfield Resident Halls, was a wooden structure built between 1902 and 1909. Allegedly built from logs salvaged from the original Guilford County Courthouse, it was razed in 1954 to add a road to the Anna M. Gove Infirmary.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Photograph of the Cornelian Society Hall inside the Students' Building taken in the 1920s. The cornerstone of the Students Building was laid in 1902. Contributions from students, faculty, and visiting speakers allowed the completion of the three story structure in 1906. It housed the Domestic Science and Manual Training Departments, the post office and book store, society halls, a banquet hall, and a 700 seat auditorium. The building was razed in 1950.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This 1920 photograph shows the entrance to the Shaw Residence Hall. The Shaw Residence Hall, designed by Harry Barton of Greensboro, North Carolina, was opened in 1919. In 1921 it was named for Anna Howard Shaw, leader in the women’s suffrage movement, who visited the campus several times. Dr. Shaw held degrees in theology and medicine and served as President of the National American Woman Suffrage Association from 1904-1916.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This photograph shows the Y.W.C.A.(Young Women's Christian Association) Hut, built in Peabody Park in 1918 by the Carpenterettes. The Y. W. C. A. Hut was built in 1918 at the end of College Avenue by the entrance to Peabody Park. A small group of students, known as the Carpenterettes, helped build the Hut because of the manpower shortage created by World War I. The Hut was built in a bungalow style with a large central hall and open fireplaces. It was used for a variety of social functions. The Y. W. C. A. secretary counseled students in her office in the Hut. The building was razed in the 1940s when North Drive was built.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Interior of the Y.W.C.A. (Young Women's Christian Association) Hut, built in Peabody Park by college students (the Carpenterettes) in 1918. The Y. W. C. A. Hut was built in 1918 at the end of College Avenue by the entrance to Peabody Park. A small group of students, known as the Carpenterettes, helped build the Hut because of the manpower shortage created by World War I. The Hut was built in a bungalow style with a large central hall and open fireplaces. It was used for a variety of social functions. The Y. W. C. A. secretary counseled students in her office in the Hut. The building was razed in the 1940s when North Drive was built.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Aerial view of campus and its surroundings before 1922. Foust Building is center, with College Avenue running parallel beside it.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This photograph shows the Y.W.C.A (Young Woman's Christian Association) Hut. The Y. W. C. A. Hut was built in 1918 at the end of College Avenue by the entrance to Peabody Park. A small group of students, known as the Carpenterettes, helped build the Hut because of the manpower shortage created by World War I. The Hut was built in a bungalow style with a large central hall and open fireplaces. It was used for a variety of social functions. The Y. W. C. A. secretary counseled students in her office in the Hut. The building was razed in the 1940s when North Drive was built.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This photograph shows the McIver Memorial Building after the addition. The McIver Memorial Building, opened in 1908, was named in honor of Charles Duncan McIver, founder and first president of the University. An east wing was added in 1920 and a west wing in 1922. It was declared unsafe in 1956 and razed in 1958.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Colorized postcard image of College Avenue of the North Carolina College for Women. The visible buildings (front to back) are Administration Building, the Carnegie Library, and the original Curry Building, circa 1920. The inscription on the postcard reads, "College Avenue, North Carolina College, Greensboro, N.C." College Avenue was designed in the early 1900s by landscape architect Warren Henry Manning to be the central artery of the campus. It was converted to a pedestrian mall in 2004. Carnegie Library, a gift of steel baron Andrew Carnegie, was designed by Hook & Sawyer of Charlotte. It opened in 1905 as the Carnegie Library. The building was partially destroyed by fire on September 15, 1932, and was enlarged during its reconstruction. The Library reopened in 1933. In 1955, the building was extensively renovated for classroom use. In 1957, the building was named for Edward Jacob Forney, School treasurer and chair of the Commercial Department from 1892 to 1940. The Curry Building (College Avenue), opened in 1902 and was named in honor of Jabez Lamar Monroe Curry, who advocated for the establishment of the State Normal and Industrial School (now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro), in the early 1890s. The building was used as a training or practice school for future teachers until it burned in 1926.

Collection: UA110 Postcards Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Black and white photographic image of the McIver Memorial Building and the drive leading up to the entrance, circa 1920. The inscription on the postcard reads," Entrance to McIver Building, North Carolina College for Women, Greensboro, N.C." The McIver Memorial Building, opened in 1908, was named in honor of Charles Duncan McIver, founder and first president of the University. An east wing was added in 1920 and a west wing in 1922. It was declared unsafe in 1956 and razed in 1958.

Collection: UA110 Postcards Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This postcard shows the second infirmary. The incription reads, "Infirmary, State Normal & Industrial College, Greensboro, N.C." This building, opened in 1912 as the second infirmary, was located on Forest Street. On May 30, 1936, the building was named in honor of Dr. Anna M. Gove who was College physician from 1893 to 1937. Between 1953, when another infirmary was built on Gray Drive, and 1965, this building was used as graduate student housing and offices. The building was razed in 1965.

Collection: UA110 Postcards Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Aerial view of campus looking west, showing McIver Memorial, Foust, Carnegie Library,and Spencer buildings and the Dining Halls Complex, as well as the Music Building (Old) which was under construction.

Collection: UA104 Photographic Prints Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Long sweet dish, painted with a depiction of Main (Foust) Building and a caption reading,""North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College. Greensboro, North Carolina." Stamp on the back reads, Made in Dresden, Germany especially for Bernau & Ellingto

Collection: UA100 Artifacts Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


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