Textiles, Teachers, and Troops

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 1880-1945

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80 records found browsing for file type Interviews.

Luis Felicia (1911-2008) came to BTC-10/ORD in November 1943, and was put in charge of running Service Club No. 1. Felicia was a professional dancer before the war, and he was put in charge of not only the Service Club but also teaching dance lessons. After the war he remained in Greensboro and opened The Felicia Studio of Dance, beside the Carolina Theater.

Collection: Greensboro Historical Museum, Inc. Archives (Greensboro History Museum)


Lula Hinton Hoskins (1921- ) graduated in 1942 from the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) and received a master of education degree from UNCG in 1979. She turned down a scholarship from Greensboro College to attend Woman's College. Hoskins lived in South Spencer Residence Hall for all four years and describes the closeness of the community, students with students and students with faculty, and the lifelong friendships she formed. She recalls campus life post-Depression and prior to and including the World War II years. Hoskins talks about how young the freshmen were with North Carolina high schools having eleven grades, the political activism of Dean Harriet Elliott and Professor Katherine Taylor and the controversy between Chancellor William Moran and the Alumni Association over funding. She emphasizes how grateful she is to the UNCG and how proud she is of the institution.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Margaret Coit Elwell (1919-2003) won the Pulitzer Prize for Biography in 1951 for her book, John C. Calhoun, American Portrait. She was a member of the class of 1941 at Woman's College of The University of North Carolina (now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro) and received an honorary degree from the College in 1959. Elwell recalls her family's life during the Depression, college life as a town student and favorite faculty. She talks about the makeup of the student body and the years prior to World War II and reminisces about her role as editor of the literary magazine, Coraddi, and fitting in on campus. She discusses writers and actors and plays and movies of the times.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Marjorie Burns (1925-2009) was a physical education major and member of the Class of 1946 at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She was a pioneer in women's golf, both teaching and playing. Burns describes campus life during World War II, the rigors and closeness of the physical education majors and the philosophies of both faculty and administration. She recalls dormitory life, how the university shaped her attitudes and her family's Tupperware business.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Marvin Richardson (1921-2010) arrived at BTC-10/ORD in April 1943 and worked as an MP (military policeman) until he left in October 1944.

Collection: Greensboro Historical Museum, Inc. Archives (Greensboro History Museum)


Mary Bailey Williams Davis (1912-1997) was a member of the Class of 1933 of the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She was a history major and class officer. Her mother and her daughter also graduated from the institution. Davis recalls student life during the Depression as a town student and graduate of Curry School. She discusses faculty role models and chancellors, traditions such as the class jacket and the visit of Eleanor Roosevelt to campus. She talks about the controversy between Chancellor William Moran and the Alumni Association and her love for the Alumni House and the institution.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Mary Elizabeth Keister (1913-2012) graduated from the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, which later became The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), with a Bachelor of Science in Secretarial Administration in 1934. From 1964-1978, she was a professor in both the School of Education and the School of Home Economics and became director of the Demonstration Research Project on Infant Care. She was the first female faculty member appointed to an Excellence Fund Professorship and in 1974 received the O. Max Gardner Award, given annually to one faculty member from each of the UNC System institutions. Keister's father was a professor at the institution, and she describes life as a faculty babysitter, which led to her interest in children. She talks about life as a town student during the Great Depression; campus traditions; the influence and dedication of faculty, especially Harriet Elliott and Florence Shaeffer; and how coeducation affected her department. She discusses the history of the child development program, the growth of the preschool, the demonstration daycare facilities and research, the influence of coeducation and the training her programs provided. She outlines building locations and the physical differences on campus from her graduation until she returned to teach in 1964. She mentions the biographical sketches she wrote about her father and other notable Greensboro people.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Mary Frances Hazelman (1913-2000) graduated in 1943 from the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). She received her master of education degree from UNCG in 1961. Hazelman describes her background, her reasons for attending Woman's College and faculty and student life at the college. She discusses dropping out of college to marry Herbert Hazelman, band director at Greensboro Senior High School, now Grimsley Senior High School, her senior year during World War II and arranging to take a final examination in Cherokee County, North Carolina, in order to graduate. She talks about her forty-four year teaching career in Greensboro, the quality of her student teachers, her work with the gifted and talented program and her intention not to teach, but to write. She brings up the present-day parking problem on campus.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Mary Jane Wharton Sockwell (1910-2007) graduated from the North Carolina College for Women, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, in 1931. She received a PhD in zoology from Yale University. Sockwell talks about receiving her doctorate, returning to Greensboro and remarrying, and the strictness and fun of student life during the Depression. She describes student government, campus traditions, dormitory life, and the many organizations on campus. Sockwell remembers influential faculty, President Julius Isaac Foust, Chancellor Walter Clinton Jackson, and Chancellor Edward Kidder Graham, Jr. She discusses her Fiftieth Class Reunion, their scholarship in honor of campus physician, Dr. Ruth Collings; and her views on the controversy between Chancellor William Moran and the Alumni Association.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Mary Lewis Harris Reed (1876-1977) graduated in 1894 from the North Carolina State Normal and Industrial School, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Reed discusses the academic life, the social life, the original faculty and administration of the school, and her relationships with the eight women who graduated with her. She talks about student teaching, her teaching career, and her music interest. Reed recalls President Charles Duncan McIver, Lady Principal Sue May Kirkland, and the commencement speech of William Jennings Bryan. The interviewer's notes include a description of the school in 1892 by Virginia Terrell Lathrop (Class of 1923), a list of the faculty, and the 1894 commencement program.

Collection: OH007 UNCG Alumni Association Oral History Program Collection, 1972-1979; (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


May Lattimore Adams (1914-2005) graduated from the commercial course at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina in 1935. She retired as a member of the administrative staff at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 1980. She discusses campus life as a student and residence hall counselor and her responsibilities working in the offices of Secretary of the College Laura Coit, dean of women and Physical Plant. She describes the administrations of Dean of Women Harriet Elliott, Chancellor Julius Isaac Foust and Chancellor Walter Clinton Jackson and her understanding of the controversy between the Alumni Association and Chancellor William Moran regarding funding.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


May Lattimore Adams (1914-2005) graduated from the commercial course at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina in 1935. She retired as a member of the administrative staff at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro in 1980. She describes the administrations of Dean of Women Harriet Elliott and Katherine Taylor and Chancellors William Whatley Pierson, Edward Kidder Graham Jr., Gordon Blackwell, Otis Singletary and James Ferguson. She talks about student life, working in the physical plant offices, the admission of men students during the Depression. She discusses the administration of Mereb Mossman, vice chancellor for academic affairs, and other prominent faculty.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Mazie Bullard (1925-2019) graduated from the commercial course at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina in 1943. She began her career at Woman's College now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, as a secretary in the admissions office and retired as director of personnel in 1987. Bullard describes the organizations of the admissions and personnel (became human resources) offices and the administrations of Chancellors Jackson, Graham, Blackwell, Ferguson and Moran. She talks about the demographics of the students, the dedication of the faculty and the changes to the institution when it became coeducational. She also discusses the Curry Laboratory School.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Mereb Mossman (1905-90) came to Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, which later became The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) in 1937 as faculty in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. She retired from UNCG in 1973 as vice chancellor for academic affairs. Mossman recalls the circumstances bringing her to Woman's College, the evolution of the sociology department and some of the top faculty and departments from her early days on campus. She describes the teaching excellence exemplified by Woman's College faculty, the small administration on campus and the move toward more faculty with doctoral degrees. She discusses the school's liberal arts curriculum, expectations of community service from the faculty and participation of faculty in student life.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Mereb Mossman (1905-90) came to Woman's College of The University of North Carolina, which later became The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) in 1937 as faculty in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. She retired from UNCG in 1973 as vice chancellor for academic affairs. Mossman discusses the importance of bringing quality faculty to the institution during its transition periods and the introspection faculty and administration went through in order to determine the institution's future. She describes the decision to become coeducational, reactions to that event and preparations for the transition. She talks about the status of this institution within the state throughout its transitions and transitions of the state university system. She recalls the issue of the speaker ban, desegregation and the creation of additional doctoral programs.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Mereb Mossman (1905-90) came to Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, which later became The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) in 1937 as faculty in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. She retired from UNCG in 1973 as vice chancellor for academic affairs. Mossman recalls the circumstances bringing her to Woman's College, the evolution of the sociology department and some of the top faculty and departments from her early days on campus. She describes the teaching excellence exemplified by Woman's College faculty, the small administration on campus and the move toward more faculty with doctoral degrees. She discusses the school's liberal arts curriculum, expectations of community service from the faculty and participation of faculty in student life.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Mereb Mossman (1905-90) came to Woman's College of The University of North Carolina, which later became The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) in 1937 as faculty in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. She retired from UNCG in 1973 as vice chancellor for academic affairs. Mossman discusses the importance of bringing quality faculty to the institution during its transition periods and the introspection faculty and administration went through in order to determine the institution's future. She describes the decision to become coeducational, reactions to that event and preparations for the transition. She talks about the status of this institution within the state throughout its transitions and transitions of the state university system. She recalls the issue of the speaker ban, desegregation and the creation of additional doctoral programs.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Olive Chandley Crawford (1900-1978) graduated in 1922 with a degree in music education from the North Carolina College for Women, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Hermene Warlick Eichhorn (1906-2001) graduated in 1926 with a major in piano and in 1927 with a major in organ from the North Carolina College for Women, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Crawford and Eichhorn describe the influence, accomplishments, and activities of head of the music department Professor Wade R. Brown at the university, in Greensboro, and statewide. They also discuss Mrs. Grace Brown, the music faculty, and the influence of President Julius I. Foust.

Collection: OH007 UNCG Alumni Association Oral History Program Collection, 1972-1979 (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Paula A. Andris (1926- ) worked for Vice Chancellors Mereb Mossman, Stanley Jones and Elisabeth Zinser from 1959-1986. Her career began when The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) was known as Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, and she retired from the position of assistant to the vice chancellor for academic affairs after twenty-seven years of service. Andris describes the administrative styles of Mereb Mossman, Stan Jones, and Elisabeth Zinser, the responsibilities of the office of academic affairs and how it evolved over the years and the allocation of funds among schools in the University of North Carolina System. She explains the transition from a mostly-female to mostly-male faculty, the involvement of faculty in the academic program over the years and the advent of computer use on campus. She also describes the one-year Commercial Certification Program from which she graduated in 1944.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Rachael Long (1921-2011) was a secretarial administration major in the Class of 1943 of the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She was a niece of North Carolina Governor William Umstead and worked in the Office of Facilities Planning at the institution during her career. Long discusses dormitory and student life and the fact that her major reflected her need for employment. She remembers where she was when she heard of America's entrance into World War II and how it affected her life, her teachers and the excellent academic reputation of Woman's College. She wishes she had taken more advantage of learning as a student and describes her views of the controversy over Alumni Association funding during Chancellor William Moran's tenure and the onset of coeducation.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Rena Bridgman Lupton (1883-1977) attended the State Normal and Industrial School, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, from 1901 to 1904. Lupton discusses arriving at the school from the country, working in the dining hall to pay her tuition, the Brick Dormitory fire of 1904, her subsequent illness, and her return to eastern North Carolina. She talks about her admiration of and appreciation for the faculty and administration, especially President Charles D. McIver. Lupton recalls the campus buildings, campus life, and the literary societies. She reminisces about her days of being the only teacher in a rural school.

Collection: OH007 UNCG Alumni Association Oral History Program Collection, 1972-1979; (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Rosemary McGee (1926- ) was a faculty member in the physical education department of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro for thirty-four years, retiring in 1988. During that time she also served as acting dean of woman students and acting dean of the School of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. McGee discusses the role of measurement and evaluation in the field of physical education, the struggle with The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for the doctoral program and the change in direction for the physical education department and faculty. She describes the strong leadership roles of women in her life and on campus and the administrative styles of Ethel Martus Lawther and Katherine Taylor. She recalls the transition to a coeducational institution, the first male faculty in her department and anecdotes from her days as residence hall counselor.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Rosemary McGee (1926- ) was a faculty member in the physical education department of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro for thirty-four years, retiring in 1988. During that time she also served as acting dean of woman students and acting dean of the School of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. McGee discusses the role of measurement and evaluation in the field of physical education, the struggle with The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for the doctoral program and the change in direction for the physical education department and faculty. She describes the strong leadership roles of women in her life and on campus and the administrative styles of Ethel Martus Lawther and Katherine Taylor. She recalls the transition to a coeducational institution, the first male faculty in her department and anecdotes from her days as residence hall counselor.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Ruth Whalin Cooke (1916- ) is a member of the Class of 1938 of the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Cooke recalls dormitory and student life and traditions and how low-cost tuition during the Depression led her and her sisters to the institution. She discusses faculty role models, administrators and chancellors, working at the Columbia University library and her perception of the decrease in prestige of the college after coeducation. Cooke talks about the controversy between Chancellor William Moran and the Alumni Association and the move to Division I athletics.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Ruth Elliott [now Ruth Elliott Doggett] (1929- ) was a member of the class of 1950 at the Woman's College of The University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG).

Elliott describes her campus life as a town student who lived near campus and had attended Curry School. She remembers her total acceptance of faculty ideas, the women veterans in her class and relations with the few men on campus. She recalls deans of women Katherine Taylor and Harriet Elliott and Chancellor Walter Clinton Jackson. She talks about the controversy between the Alumni Association and Chancellor William Moran and the move to Division I athletics.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


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