Textiles, Teachers, and Troops

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 1880-1945

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80 records found browsing for file type Interviews.

Elizabeth Yates King (1915-2003) was an English major and member of the Class of 1936 of the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She began her freshman year when the institution was named the North Carolina College for Women. She was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. King discusses campus life as a town student during the Great Depression when men were students and the Works Projects Administration helped build the Alumni House. She talks about student government, campus traditions, the prominence of the concert series and being editor of The Carolinian student newspaper. She recalls the loss of academic standing and the small college atmosphere when the institution became coeducational, but the importance of being part of the Consolidated University of North Carolina. She describes influential faculty and administrators such as Harriet Elliott, Walter Clinton Jackson, and Jane Summerell; her views of the controversy between Chancellor William Moran and the Alumni Association and the move to Division I athletics.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Eloise R. 'Pattie' Lewis (1920-1999) helped create the School of Nursing at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). She served as the first dean of the School of Nursing from 1966-1985. Lewis talks about her background, education and US Army service during World War II. She describes coming to UNCG, the struggle to get a nursing program placed at UNCG and the development of the program. She discusses the school's interactions with the local medical community, the move towards national accreditation, and the eventual addition of a Sigma Theta Tau chapter on campus. She recalls the first class of nursing students, the construction of the nursing building, the first male student in the program and the addition of the master's program.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Eloise R. 'Pattie' Lewis (1920-1999) helped create the School of Nursing at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). She served as the first dean of the School of Nursing from 1966-1985. Lewis talks about her background, education and US Army service during World War II. She describes coming to UNCG, the struggle to get a nursing program placed at UNCG and the development of the program. She discusses the school's interactions with the local medical community, the move towards national accreditation, and the eventual addition of a Sigma Theta Tau chapter on campus. She recalls the first class of nursing students, the construction of the nursing building, the first male student in the program and the addition of the master's program.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Esther Bagwell Mathews (1926- ) completed her undergraduate degree in music education at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina (now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro) in 1949. Mathews recalls her student days, including the restrictions of life on campus, the body mechanics course, social activities and the effect of World War II. She describes student teaching at the Curry School on campus, the rigorous life of a music major, and influential music faculty and administrators such as Harriet Elliott, Alleine Minor, Elvira Prondecki, and Katherine Taylor. Mathews discusses her feeling that the quality of student has decreased in the School of Music and that educational standards have decreased in the public schools. She talks about Chancellor Walter Jackson, the move to Division I athletics and the Chancellor William Moran/Alumni Association controversy and the involvement of Vice Chancellor Bernard Keele.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Evon Welch Dean (1924-2011) graduated from the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, in 1942 with a commercial degree. She became the administrative assistant to the alumni secretary in 1942 and retired in 1986 as assistant to the vice chancellor of university advancement. She received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award. Dean describes the strong academic reputation of the institution; the closeness of the faculty and staff and the strength of the women faculty, administrators and graduates. She talks about prominent chancellors, alumni association presidents, faculty and administrators and the changes she witnessed as the university was transformed from a residential to a commuter school. She discusses the campus protests during the Vietnam War and her views on political activism.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Frances Ashcraft McBane (1926- ) graduated from the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, which later became The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG), with a Bachelor of Science in Music in 1948 and received a Master of Music degree in 1971. McBane discusses campus and dormitory life, the role of the housemother, role models such as Professor Kathryn England and influential music faculty. She describes the demanding academic life of a music major, the high quality of the School of Music, the details of some music courses and how some students only learned the first and last parts of their pieces for the exams. McBane talks about the World War II years on campus and eating and working in the cafeteria. She emphasizes the pride of the all-women institution and how that imbued leadership and confidence in the students through opportunity.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Frances F. Brinkley (1927-2009) was a member of the Class of 1949 at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She majored in elementary education. Brinkley describes student life on campus during the late 1940s, the role of faculty and how her experiences led to her liberal outlook. She recalls the daisy chain, class jackets and the close friendships she made.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


George Dickieson (1912-2004) was a faculty member in the School of Music at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) from 1938-1977. He was conductor of what became the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra. Dickieson discusses establishing the orchestra and instrumental music program at the college, the growth of the School of Music, `faculty life and the arrival of coeducation and integration. He recalls the administrations of several chancellors, especially Edward Kidder Graham Jr. and the divisiveness his tenure brought to the institution. He discusses his relationships with the deans of the School of Music from Wade Brown to Lawrence Hart and administrators Katherine Taylor and Mereb Mossman.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Grace Parker Boutwell (1913-1998) was a member of the Class of 1938 with a major in secretarial administration at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). Boutwell talks about her lack of preparation before attending the college, campus life during the Depression, and the curriculum and traditions. She talks about Chancellor Walter Clinton Jackson and his daughter, who was her roommate. She describes the faculty and administrators who influenced her, her perception of the decline of academic rigor during the sixties and seventies and the Sedalia Singers, an African-American group who performed at Woman's College.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Harriett J. Kupferer (1922-2006) completed her undergraduate degree in physical education at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina in 1943. She returned to the school in 1961 and taught in the Department of Anthropology until her retirement in 1984 from The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, serving as the first department chair from 1974-1984. Kupferer recalls her student days at Woman's College including the restrictions of life on campus, the social activities and the effect of World War II on campus. She describes the facilities, assemblies and chapels and the May Day celebration. She discusses changes after her return such as coeducation, a move toward more faculty with PhDs and the separation of the sociology and anthropology departments. She recalls the administrations of Chancellors Otis Singletary and James Ferguson and Vice Chancellor Mereb Mossman.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Helen A. Thrush (1903-2006) was a professor and interim head of the Department of Art at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina and subsequently The University of North Carolina at Greensboro from 1939-1969. Thrush recalls joining Woman's College because of the gifted and inspirational Gregory Ivy, the head of the art department; her love of teaching; the growth of the department; and the talented students and faculty. She describes the effects of coeducation, integration, adult students after World War II, and the Chancellor Edward Kidder Graham, Jr. controversy, including the resignation of Mr. Ivy. Thrush talks about Chancellor Walter Clinton Jackson, Vice Chancellor Mereb Mossman, and Dean Katherine Taylor as well as the Arts Festival and the beginnings of the Weatherspoon Art Gallery. She feels the biggest change to the university during her tenure is the loss of the 'family' atmosphere of the faculty.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project; (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Helen Howerton Lineberry (1919-2012) was an art major in the class of 1938 at Woman's College of The University of North Carolina (now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro). Lineberry recalls coming to Woman's College as a transfer student, campus and dormitory life, and campus traditions. She talks about the institution's camaraderie, a summer art course at Beaufort, North Carolina, and prominent faculty and administrators such Professor Gregory Ivy, Chancellor Walter Clinton Jackson, and Dean Katherine Taylor. She discusses experiencing the War of the Worlds news bulletin performance, coeducation, the Alumni Association-Chancellor William E. Moran controversy, and the building construction and renovation under Chancellor Moran. She remembers integration coming to the Greensboro Public Schools.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Hilda Weil Wallerstein (1905-1996) graduated in 1926 with a degree in physical education from the North Carolina College for Women, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. In 1988, she received the Alumni Distinguished Service Award for her many years of service to the university. Wallerstein talks about campus rules and regulations; dating boys, but not being allowed to dance with them; checking in and out of the dorm; and returning to the dorm after hours. She mentions Jewish students; Rosenthal Gymnasium, which was named after her great-uncle Joe Rosenthal; and Weil Residence Hall, which was named after her grandmother Mina Rosenthal Weil. Wallerstein also expresses her approval of the college transitioning to a co-education institution in 1963.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project; (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Jane Linville Joyner (1925-2002) received a Bachelor of Arts in English Phi Beta Kappa from the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, in 1946. She received the Weil Fellowship for graduate study. Joyner recalls the prestige of attending Woman's College, the quality of her education and attending Columbia University. She describes campus life during World War II, the death of President Franklin Roosevelt, serving in student government and being a junior house president. She talks about campus traditions, such as Daisy Chain and Tuesday Chapel, the students' pride in Dean Harriet Elliott, faculty relationships, dormitory counselors and life on the freshman quad.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Janice Hooke Moore (now Little) (1925- ) graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the Woman's College of The University of North Carolina in 1944 (now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro or UNCG) as a French major and had attended Curry School. She received a Master of Arts in French in 1970 and a Master of Library Science in 1980. Moore recalls her experience at Curry School and campus life as a town student, a resident student and the child of a faculty member. She discusses the caring and dedicated faculty and administrators who influenced her, the importance of an all-female education, student government, classes, the World War II years and the concert-lecture series. Moore talks about the controversial Chancellor Edward Kidder Graham Jr., her views that UNCG and North Carolina A&T State University will combine and the rift between Chancellor William Moran and the Alumni Association. She discusses campus traditions, coeducation and the move to Division I athletics.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Joanne Craft (1929- ) graduated from the Woman's College of The University of North Carolina in 1950 (now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro or UNCG). She was a secretarial administration major and attended Curry School on campus. Craft recalls her experience at Curry School and campus life as a town student and a resident student. She discusses faculty and administrators who influenced her, student activities, classes, buildings and transportation. She talks about her views on the rift between Chancellor William Moran and the Alumni Association, fundraising in general, coeducation and the move to Division I athletics. She mentions other Greensboro alumni who might be good candidates to interview.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Key Barkley (1900-2001) was a professor in the department of psychology from 1931-1949. He also served as dean of men when men were admitted to The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina during the Great Depression and was responsible for establishing a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa on campus. Barkley describes his work establishing a psychology lab at Woman's College and relates the close mindedness, fearful atmosphere and lack of research he found on the campus. He tells of the tenure of several key figures including Julius Foust, Frank Porter Graham, and Harriet Elliott. He describes the college being coeducational during the Depression, recalls the pacifist movement of the 1930s and explains the impact of WWII on campus. He also describes counseling students on life decisions, personal problems and homosexuality.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Key Barkley (1900-2001) was a professor in the department of psychology from 1931-1949. He also served as dean of men when men were admitted to The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina during the Great Depression and was responsible for establishing a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa on campus. Barkley describes his work establishing a psychology lab at Woman's College and relates the close mindedness, fearful atmosphere and lack of research he found on the campus. He tells of the tenure of several key figures including Julius Foust, Frank Porter Graham, and Harriet Elliott. He describes the college being coeducational during the Depression, recalls the pacifist movement of the 1930s and explains the impact of WWII on campus. He also describes counseling students on life decisions, personal problems and homosexuality.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Laura Brown Quinn (1921- ) graduated from Woman's College of the University of North Carolina Phi Beta Kappa as a sociology major in 1942. She received her Master of Education in 1973, majoring in child development and family relations from the same institution, now known as The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Quinn perused the 1942 Pine Needles as she was interviewed. She describes academically competing with eleven years of schooling, campus and student life as a town student as she married during her junior year, her social service career and working in the library. She discusses influential faculty such as Dean Mossman, Louis Alexander, Virginia Stephens, Lyda Shivers, Hugh Altvater and George Thompson. She talks about life prior to World War II, famous people who lectured at the college and the differences on campus when she came back as graduate student.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Laura G. Anderton (1918-2011) began her career at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina as an instructor in the department of biology in 1948. She served as associate professor and professor of biology and as associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at UNCG (The University of North Carolina at Greensboro) and retired in 1986. Anderton discusses her counseling and teaching experiences and the changes in makeup of the student body during her tenure. She describes her scientific research and collection of science department photographs.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Lillian Spencer Steele lived in Greensboro and got a civilian job on base in 1943 as an administrative assistant, mainly typing orders for the men shipping out to other bases.

Collection: Greensboro Historical Museum, Inc. Archives (Greensboro History Museum)


Lois Edinger (1925- ) began her career in 1962 at the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, later becoming The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). In 1988, she retired as a professor in the School of Education. She was president of the National Education Association during1964-65 and received the O. Max Gardner Award from the University of North Carolina System in 1966. Edinger discusses the priorities, programs and administrations of the School of Education, especially placing student teachers, and the tenures of chancellors of the university and deans of the School during her career. She describes the establishment of a women's center, the male/female ratio of faculty and the strengths of the female administrators. She talks about the Curry Laboratory School and the introduction of coeducation and integration and their effect on teacher education and student teachers. She recalls campus protests during the 1960s and 1970s.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Louise Dannenbaum Falk (1908-1997) graduated from the North Carolina College for Women in 1929. The name of the institution was changed to the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, and now is called The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). She received an honorary doctor of laws degree in 1975 from UNCG and served on the Board of Trustees. Falk describes student life and traditions, student government, campus traditions and influential faculty and administrators, such as Harriet Elliott and Katherine Taylor. She talks about being house president of her dormitory, faculty/student relationships and the effects of the Depression. She discusses the tenure of Chancellor Edward Kidder Graham Jr., the move to Division I athletics and the controversy between Chancellor William E. Moran and the Alumni Association.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Louise Dannenbaum Falk (1908-1997) graduated from the North Carolina College for Women in 1929. The name of the institution was changed to the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, and now is called The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG). She received an honorary doctor of laws degree in 1975 from UNCG and served on the Board of Trustees. Falk describes student life and traditions, student government, campus traditions and influential faculty and administrators, such as Harriet Elliott and Katherine Taylor. She talks about being house president of her dormitory, faculty/student relationships and the effects of the Depression. She discusses the tenure of Chancellor Edward Kidder Graham Jr., the move to Division I athletics and the controversy between Chancellor William E. Moran and the Alumni Association.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Lucy Horne Leath (1926- ) was a home economics major and member of the Class of 1947 at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Leath talks about her background, campus life during World War II, the close-knit residential community of the College, academic life and her student activities. She remembers faculty such as Bess Rosa, Louise Alexander, Mereb Mossman, George Wilson and Lyda Gordon Shivers and turning down a summer babysitting position with prominent North Carolina legislator and president of the Home Economics Foundation, Sue Ramsey Johnston Ferguson, Class of 1918. She discusses the impact of death during World War II, especially the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. She describes how coeducation and commuting students affected the academic standing of the institution and her love for Woman's College and how her education led her to learn to think independently. She talks about her disappointment when Governor James Martin did not allow members of an alumni train trip to Raleigh not tour the Governor's Mansion.

Collection: OH003 UNCG Centennial Oral History Project (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


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