Textiles, Teachers, and Troops

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 1880-1945

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86 records found searching with the keyword/s File Collection.

A collection of letters related to requests for information for “The History, Development, and Influence of Cotton Mills in North Carolina”. The inquiries were made by State Normal and Industrial College librarian Annie F. Petty and future alumnus Clara Booth Byrd. Assisting in the research were Bernard Cone, D. A. Tompkins, and representatives of many cotton mills and banks.

Collection: North Carolina Vertical File Collection (UNCG University Libraries) (UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This circa 1930s photograph shows the Administration Building from Administration Drive. This building, designed by Epps & Hackett of Greensboro, North Carolina, was opened in 1892. Two flanking wings were added in 1895. From 1892 to 1908, the building was called Main Building and from 1908 to 1960 it was called Administration Building. In 1960, the building was named in honor of Julius Isaac Foust, president of College from 1906 to 1934. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This photograph shows the back view of Alumnae House in 1937. This building opened in 1937 and is considered an excellent example of neo-Georgian architecture. It was designed by Penrose V. Stout and modeled after Homewood in Baltimore, Maryland. The building was called the Alumnae House from 1937 to November 1972, when the name was changed to the Alumni House.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Drawing of Alumnae House. This building opened in 1937 and is considered an excellent example of neo-Georgian architecture. It was designed by Penrose V. Stout and modeled after Homewood in Baltimore, Maryland. The building was called the Alumnae House from 1937 to November 1972, when the name was changed to the Alumni House.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This photograph show the Alumnae House and College Avenue after a snowstorm in the winter of 1949. This building opened in 1937 and is considered an excellent example of neo-Georgian architecture. It was designed by Penrose V. Stout and modeled after Homewood in Baltimore, Maryland. The building was called the Alumnae House from 1937 to November 1972, when the name was changed to the Alumni House.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Photograph of the Alumnae House as seen from College Ave in 1937. The sign in front of house reads ""Federal Public Works Project No. 6118, Job A"" This building opened in 1937 and is considered an excellent example of neo-Georgian architecture. It was designed by Penrose V. Stout and modeled after Homewood in Baltimore, Maryland. The building was called the Alumnae House from 1937 to November 1972, when the name was changed to the Alumni House.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This photograph shows the amphitheatre with the lake. The amphitheatre, and a lake, were designed by J. D. Spinks, an engineer from Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and constructed by the Works Project Administration (WPA), in 1941. Located on a former nine-hole golf course, it was bordered by a lake on three sides with a maze of walkways, bridges, and steps approaching the structure. It had a seating capacity of 2500 people and included an outdoor stage to be used for meetings, May Day celebrations, plays, and pageants. It was razed in 1954 and the area was restored to meadowland. A lake and an amphitheatre were designed by J. D. Spinks, an engineer from Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and constructed by the Works Project Administration (WPA), in 1941. The lake was approximately six feet deep in the deeper parts and two feet deep nearer the shore. Two small creeks running through the nine-hole golf course provided the water. At the edge of the lake nearest the tennis courts, a boat house was built, affording room for eight or ten small boats. A dam was also constructed near the West Market side of the lake. It was seventy-five feet in length and held the water for the lake that covered three acres. Eventually, neighborhood complaints and the mosquitoes brought about by stagnant water caused the lake to be drained in1954. It was subsequently returned to a golf course.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Includes the original name of North Carolina Agricultural and Technology State University as it was known as Agricultural and Mechanical College for Colored Race. This issue mentions the names of the officers and faculty of the college, description of the different factories and departments, and how Cotton Mill and Manufacturing Plants contributed to the growth of Greensboro. Also mentions the emergence of businesses because of the success of the Cotton Mill and Manufacturing Plants.

Collection: North Carolina Vertical File Collection (UNCG University Libraries) (UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: Cone Mills Corporation; Textile industry -- North Carolina -- Greensboro


This 1950 photograph shows the view of College Avenue from stairs of Curry Building across Spring Garden Street. College Avenue was designed in the early 1900s by landscape architect Warren Henry Manning to be the central artery of the campus. It was converted to a pedestrian mall in 2004. Spring Garden Street is a main east/west artery running through the heart of the campus. The section of Spring Garden Street between Aycock Street and Tate Street was extensively improved in 1998 to create a landscaped boulevard.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This photograph, which appeared in the 1950 Pine Needles, shows College Avenue from the entrance of the Curry Building. College Avenue was designed in the early 1900s by landscape architect Warren Henry Manning to be the central artery of the campus. It was converted to a pedestrian mall in 2004.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This February 1949 photograph shows Curry Cottage with traces of snow on the ground. The Curry Cottage, opened in 1948 on the Curry School grounds, was used by Curry School home economics students and Woman’s College home economics majors. For three years starting in 1968, Curry Cottage provided a place for teenage girls, who were pregnant, to continue their schooling.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This photograph shows the entrance to the Curry Cottage. The Curry Cottage, opened in 1948 on the Curry School grounds, was used by Curry School home economics students and Woman’s College home economics majors. For three years starting in 1968, Curry Cottage provided a place for teenage girls, who were pregnant, to continue their schooling.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This 1950 photograph shows Carnegie Library from College Avenue. This building, a gift of steel baron Andrew Carnegie, was designed by Hook & Sawyer of Charlotte. It opened in 1905 as the Carnegie Library. The building was partially destroyed by fire on September 15, 1932, and was enlarged during its reconstruction. The Library reopened in 1933. In 1955, the building was extensively renovated for classroom use. In 1957, the building was named for Edward Jacob Forney, School treasurer and chair of the Commercial Department from 1892 to 1940.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This folder contains a catalogue of the officers and students who attended Greensboro Female College during the collegiate year of 1875-1876. The brochure includes tuition cost, uniform information worn by the students, visitation rules, list of students, faculty, and trustees.

Collection: North Carolina Vertical File Collection (UNCG University Libraries) (UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: Greensboro College (N.C.)


This photograph shows the construction of the Library in February 1950. The library building, designed by Northrup O’Brien of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, opened in 1950. In 1960 it was named for Walter Clinton Jackson, professor, author, and chancellor from 1934 to 1950.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This 1950 photograph shows the Library under construction. The library building, designed by Northrup O’Brien of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, opened in 1950. In 1960 it was named for Walter Clinton Jackson, professor, author, and chancellor from 1934 to 1950.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This 1937 photograph shows the Library inside the Alumnae House. This building opened in 1937 and is considered an excellent example of neo-Georgian architecture. It was designed by Penrose V. Stout and modeled after Homewood in Baltimore, Maryland. The building was called the Alumnae House from 1937 to November 1972, when the name was changed to the Alumni House.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


This circa 1940s photograph shows the McIver House, as seen from across Spring Garden Street. This two-story, ten-room house was built on the southwest corner of College Avenue and Spring Garden Street for President McIver and his family. Mrs. McIver lived there until her death in December 1944. It was torn down in 1952 and since then has been commemorated on two occasions.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Photograph of the Brown Building as seen from Tate Street circa 1927. This building, originally called the Music Building, was designed by Harry Barton, of Greensboro, North Carolina, and was opened in 1925. In 1960, the building was named in honor of Wade R. Brown, head of the Department of Music from 1912 to 1936. The building remained home to the School of Music until 1999, when the new Music Building was completed. It is currently called the Brown Building.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


[Office and a Civilian]

DeFelice, Jerry

1943-1946

An officer and a civilian sit behind a desk and look over a file.

Collection: Photo Collection -- Jerry DeFelice (Greensboro History Museum)

Subjects: Greensboro (N.C.) -- History--20th century; World War, 1939-1945; AAF Overseas Replacement Depot and AAF Redistribution Station No. 5 (U.S.)


This 1937 photograph shows the Pecky Cypress Room on ground floor of the Alumnae House. This building opened in 1937 and is considered an excellent example of neo-Georgian architecture. It was designed by Penrose V. Stout and modeled after Homewood in Baltimore, Maryland. The building was called the Alumnae House from 1937 to November 1972, when the name was changed to the Alumni House.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Ragsdale-Mendenhall Residence Hall pictured in 1950. The Ragsdale Residence Hall, designed by Northrup & O’Brien of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, opened in 1950 and was named in honor of Virginia Ragsdale, Department of Mathematics faculty, from 1911 to 1928 and the third faculty member to hold a PhD degree. The Mendenhall Residence Hall, designed by Northrup & O’Brien of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, opened in 1950 and was named in honor of Gertrude Whittier Mendenhall, Head of Department of Mathematics from 1892 to 1926.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Ragsdale-Mendenhall Residence Hall, 1950. Cars are parked along Gray Drive in front of the dorm, and a student in a long dress is walking past. The Ragsdale Residence Hall, designed by Northrup & O’Brien of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, opened in 1950 and was named in honor of Virginia Ragsdale, Department of Mathematics faculty, from 1911 to 1928 and the third faculty member to hold a PhD degree. The Mendenhall Residence Hall, designed by Northrup & O’Brien of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, opened in 1950 and was named in honor of Gertrude Whittier Mendenhall, Head of Department of Mathematics from 1892 to 1926.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Shaw Residence Hall, as seen from Walker Avenue, in 1949. Shaw Residence Hall, designed by Harry Barton of Greensboro, North Carolina, was opened in 1919. In 1921 it was named for Anna Howard Shaw, leader in the women’s suffrage movement, who visited the campus several times. Shaw held degrees in theology and medicine and served as President of the National American Woman Suffrage Association from 1904-1916.

Collection: UA103 Negatives Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Navy blue silk chiffon dress with white file collar owned by Clora McNeill Foust, wife of Julius I. Foust. The dress has button-front closure that extends to the hipline and a black plastic belt. It was featured in the July 1, 1933 copy of Vogue magazine on page twenty-six.

Collection: UA107 Textile Collection (Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives, UNCG University Libraries)

Subjects: University of North Carolina at Greensboro


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