Wish You Were Here… Creating Travel Brochures for the Homes of North Carolina Authors

Learning outcomes

Students will:

  • Share experiences about places they have previously visited in North Carolina, discuss interesting places they would like to visit in North Carolina.
  • Use the NC Literary Map to discover where selected authors live in North Carolina. Share what they already know about the region/county/city where selected authors live in North Carolina.
  • Use the NC Literary Map Cultural Resources website to research the region/city/county where selected North Carolina authors live, seeking information that would convince others to visit this destination.
  • Compile relevant information about each destination in a travel brochure using the Read Write Think: Online Printing Press
  • Share information with class, using persuasive arguments, to convince others to visit their selected destination

Teacher Planning

Time required for lesson: 3-4 class sessions

Materials/resources

Pre-activities (Day 1 and 2)

Build on students’ prior knowledge and inspire their thinking about travel destinations by having them recall a trip in North Carolina they may have taken. Possible discussion questions:

  • Where did they go?
  • How did they select their destination?
  • How did they get there?
  • What did they see?
  • What did they do?
  • Where did they stay?
  • What was the best part of their trip?
  • What was the worst part of their trip?
  • What do they remember most about the trip?
  • What would they like to do if they travelled here again?

Tell students their task is to pretend the Board of Tourism is looking for ways to promote North Carolina authors and their works. The tourism commission wishes to develop travel brochures that will persuade tourists to visit North Carolina, specifically destinations where authors reside. Students will use various resources to

  • learn where authors reside in NC
  • discover interesting attributes of the region/county/city where an author resides
  • design a travel brochure that would be helpful in persuading tourists to visit this destination
  • share their brochures with their classmates, deciding which destinations are most effectively promoted and would be most interesting to visit.

Preview the NC Literary Map with students to discover where authors live in the state. Ask students to decide which destinations would be interesting for tourists to discover. Have them discuss

  • Why would someone want to visit this place? What makes it interesting?
  • What might someone see or do in the selected destination?
  • How could someone learn more about this place?
  • What information might someone need to plan a trip to this destination?
  • How could living in this destination shape the way an author writes?

Preview the NC Literary Map Cultural Resources website with students. Show them the various websites they may access to learn more about places to visit in North Carolina.

  • Recommended websites:
    • North Carolina Historic Sites: NC Historic Sites opens doors into the past helping to more fully understand the world we live in today.
    • VisitNC: This is the official tourism website of North Carolina.
    • NCpedia: This site provides information on North Carolina counties, communities, famous people, government, history and symbols.

Preview VisitNC, the official tourism website of North Carolina. Access the Brochures page to share examples of travel brochures about North Carolina destinations.

Discuss with students what makes a successful travel brochure, using these brochures as examples or printed brochures from the local chamber of commerce or visitor’s center. Discuss with students:

  • What types of information are included to make the brochure interesting and informative?
  • Are there maps? photos? diagrams? other illustrations?
  • How is text presented? paragraphs? bulleted lists?
  • Are there specific places or events highlighted?

Preview the Read, Write Think Online Printing Press website to show students how to create a travel brochure. (Students may also create a travel brochure using supplies located in the classroom: paper, markers, pencils, pens, pictures from travel magazines, etc.)

Tell students to be thinking about

  • which author they will select and whether they will gather information about a region/county/city
  • what types of information they will need to gather
  • how they will organize information to successfully promote their destination.

Share the planning sheet and assessment rubric with students so they will be aware of expectations for completing tasks.

Allow time for planning.

Activities (Days 3 and 4)

Remind students of their task to persuade tourists to visit the region/county/city where a North Carolina author lives. Review with students what makes a travel brochure useful and interesting. Look again at the sample brochures. Ask students how travel brochures persuade people to visit certain destinations. Have students think about

  • Who is the audience for this brochure?
  • What is the purpose?
  • What types of information and illustrations should be included in the brochure to help persuade tourists to visit this destination?

Share the Things to Include in a Travel Brochure Handout. Instruct students to

  • select their author
  • access the NC Literature Map Cultural Resources website or print resources to gather information about the region/county/city where the author resides
  • use the planning sheet to organize information and citations

Allow time for research and compiling data. (Students will need to save images to a file for later use with the online printing press.)

Allow time for students to access the Read, Write, Think, Online Printing Press to publish their travel brochure.

Students’ final task:

  • Share your brochure with your class
  • Use persuasive arguments to convince them you have effectively promoted your selected destination should be paid by the Tourism Commission for your hard work.
  • The class may vote on which destinations would be most likely to be visited by tourists based on the brochures and the presentations.

Assessment

  4 3 2 1
Organization I used the Planning Sheet to organize all of my information. I included citations for each source I used. I used the Planning Sheet to organize most of my information. I included citations for most of the sources I used. I used the Planning Sheet to organize some of my information. I include citations for some of my sources. I did not complete the Planning Sheet. I did not include citations for my sources.
Organization The brochure has excellent formatting and information is very well organized. The brochure has appropriate formatting and information is well-organized. The brochure has some organized information with random formatting. The brochure's format and organization are confusing to the reader.
Ideas I included the author’s name and at least 5 facts about the destination on the Travel Brochure. All information was relevant and appropriate for the intended audience. I included the author’s name and at least 4 facts about the destination on the Travel Brochure. Most information was relevant and appropriate for the intended audience. I included the author’s name and at least 3 facts about the destination on the Travel Brochure. Some information is irrelevant or inappropriate for the intended audience. I had 2 or fewer facts recorded on the Travel Brochure. Information was irrelevant or inappropriate for the intended audience.
Spelling Punctuation It was easy to read my work because I used correct spelling, capitalization and punctuation on all of my work. It was fairly easy to read my work because I used correct spelling, capitalization and punctuation on most of my work. It was difficult to read my work because there were several spelling, capitalization and punctuation errors. It was very difficult to read my work because there were many spelling, capitalization and/or punctuation errors.
Use of time I participated in class discussions. I used my time wisely in class and at home. My project was completed on time. I participated in class discussions. I used most of my time wisely. My project was completed on time. I did not participate in class discussions. I did not use my time wisely. My project was completed on time. I did not participate in class discussions. I did not use my time wisely. My project was not completed on time.
Graphics The graphics go well with the text, and there is a good mix of text and graphics. The graphics go well with text, but there are some that distract from text. The graphics go well with the text, but there are too few. The graphics do not go with the text.
Oral Presentation Interesting, with smooth delivery that holds audience attention. Relatively interesting, with fairly smooth delivery that usually holds audience attention. Delivery not smooth, but able to hold audience attention most of the time. Delivery not smooth and audience attention lost.

Supplemental Information

This lesson was adapted for North Carolina standards from Design a Travel Brochure, a lesson by Lisa Storm Frink for Read, Write, Think sponsored by NCTE.

North Carolina Common Core/Essential Standards

Elementary Social Studies

3.G.1.1 Find absolute and relative locations of places within the local community and region.

4.C.1 Understand the impact of various cultural groups on North Carolina.

English Language Arts

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.5.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.7 Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.9 Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Information and Technology

4.TT.1 Use technology tools and skills to reinforce classroom concepts and activities.

4.TT.1.1 Use a variety of technology tools to gather data and information (e.g., Web-based resources, e-books, online communication tools, etc.).

4.TT.1.2 Use a variety of technology tools to organize data and information (e.g., word processor, graphic organizer, audio and visual recording, online collaboration tools, etc.).

4.TT.1.3 Use technology tools to present data and information (multimedia, audio and visual recording, online collaboration tools, etc.).

4.SI.1 Apply criteria to determine appropriate information resources for specific topics and purposes.