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Tommie Lou Smith

Gender: Female

Ethnicity: Caucasian

Biographical/Historical note: Tommie Lou Smith was born on October 11, 1922 in Morehead City, North Carolina. She earned a AB in 1942 and a MA in 1945 from East Carolina College (now University). From September 1942 to June 1943 she taught at Campbell College. From 1945 to 1946 she served as a temporary instructor at East Carolina College. In 1946 she was hired as an instructor in the Department of Business Education at Woman's College (now The University of North Carolina at Greensboro). In 1963 she was appointed associate dean of women of the university. She later became an assistant professor in the School of Business and Economics. She retired from the university in 1975 and opened White Night Flying Service, Inc. She passed away November 19, 2008.

Items created by this individual or group:
Item thumbnail image Resolution adopted by the faculty council of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro at a called meeting on March 28, 1969
Date: March 28, 1969
By: Tommie Lou Smith
From: Chancellor James Sharbrough Ferguson Records
This resolution, adopted by the Faculty Council of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) on March 28, 1969, calls for immediate negotiations between food service contractor ARA Slater ...
Item thumbnail image Memorandum on UNCG Negro students enrollment
Date: February 18, 1969
By: Tommie Lou Smith
From: Chancellor James Sharbrough Ferguson Records
This February 18, 1969, memorandum from Tommie Lou Smith to University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) Dean Mereb E. Mossman details black student enrollment at UNCG in fall, 1968. A total of s...
Item thumbnail image Student retention at UNCG
Date: February 23, 1970
By: Tommie Lou Smith
From: Chancellor James Sharbrough Ferguson Records
This memo between staff administrators at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro on February 23, 1970, outlines the current enrollment and retention of black students at the university....