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W.C. Informer Number 5

Date: March 17, 1946

Author: Woman's College Chapter of the Committee for North Carolina

Biographical/Historical abstract: The Woman's College Chapter of the Committee for North Carolina was an affiliate of the Southern Conference for Human Welfare and published a newsletter, W.C. Informer, in 1946.

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Description:

The fifth issue of W.C. Informer discusses an incident in Columbia, Tennessee, in which a black veteran and a white fought over an insult to the veteran's mother. Afterward, a group of fifty to seventy-five whites stormed the jail and roamed the streets of the "negro district". Four police officers were shot by a black citizen, resulting in the subsequent arrests of approximately one hundred black persons, two of whom were shot and killed while in custody. This incident, which became known as the Columbia Race Riot, also allegedly involved looting and shootings by highway patrol officers. Several officers were tried, but not convicted; three black defendants were convicted, but two of the convictions were overturned due to lack of evidence. The newsletter urges students to write the U.S. Attorney General demanding an investigation.

The newsletter also discusses a pending atomic energy bill and includes a quote from Abraham Lincoln on race relations and the effects of "dehumanizing the Negro."

W.C. Informer was a publication of the Woman's College Chapter of the Committee for North Carolina, an affiliate of the Southern Conference on Human Welfare (SCHW)located at the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina in Greensboro. SCHW was at the forefront of early civil rights and social justice issues.

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Format of original: Printed Materials

Collection: University Archives Subject Files

Repository: The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Item#: 1.58.1357

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