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Racial Balance Busing

Date: circa October 1971

Author: Clarence Harris

Biographical/Historical abstract: Clarence Lee "Curly" Harris (1905-1999) was the manager of the F.W. Woolworth store in Greensboro when four North Carolina A&T State University students sat-in at the lunch counter on February 1, 1960, setting off civil rights protests in Greensboro and throughout the country.

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Description: This handwritten letter to the editor by Clarence “Curly” Harris was written in response to an October 3, 1971 editorial in the Durham Morning Herald, entitled "Folly of Racial Balance Busing." In this letter, Harris expresses his agreement with Senator Sam Ervin's position that "massive busing" is not an appropriate means of desegregating public schools, and states that desegregation is a nationwide issue, not just a southern one. Harris cites problems such as transportation, cost, the inconsistent geographic distribution of the minority population, and the concept of freedom of choice. Harris was manager of the Greensboro Woolworth store at the time of the 1960 sit-ins.

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Format of original: Correspondence

Collection: Clarence Lee Harris Papers

Repository: The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Item#: 1.4.1150

Rights: It is responsibility of the user to follow the copyright law of the United States (Title 17, U.S. Code). Materials are not to be reproduced in published works without written consent, and any use should credit Civil Rights Greensboro and the appropriate repository.

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